Sunday, September 18, 2016

Store e Telling August September 2015: Workshops

The Pearl of the Elephant
by
Edmund Dulac, 1920

I have been remiss in continuing to share my Stor  e Telling articles from 2015. Since the conference proposal season is upon us it seems timely to post these resources from the August September 2015 issue of Storytelling Magazine.

The theme for this issue of Storytelling Magazine issue was workshops and I selected some articles, tutorials and icebreakers to help make your next workshop truly work!

If you have the time or the inclination, I would love it if you would leave a comment and let me know if this information is useful for your work. I read and respond to every comment and love hearing from you!


10 Steps To Plan a Workshop – Tips to help you design your workshop, craft an agenda, select a venue, and more.

A Workbook On Designing Successful Workshops – A forty-three page booklet with detailed instructions, including work pages, to plan and conduct a successful workshops.
http://www.mcgill.ca/medicinefacdev/files/medicinefacdev/DesigningWorkshopsWorkbook.pdf

Community Toolbox: Conducting a Workshop – Helpful steps and information organize and present your workshop. There are other sections that cover organizing conferences, retreats and teleconferences.

How To Run a Good Workshop – Very useful tips in a short article by bestselling author and speaker Scott Berkun.
http://scottberkun.com/2013/run-a-good-workshop/

Planning A Workshop: Organizing and Running a Successful Event
https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/PlanningAWorkshop.htm

Interested in using Skype to conduct your workshops? Below are three tutorials to help you quickly climb the learning ladder.

4 Things to Help Novice Users of Virtual Meeting Tools: Making Skype Meetings Run Smoothly

Skype Tutorial – Four separate, short tutorials that will help you learn how to use Skype from beginning to end.
And if you prefer a video tutorial, follow this link.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMAeAeyh7zM

Some sites offering icebreakers and activities to add conviviality to your workshops.

40 Icebreakers for Small Groups

100 Ways to Energize Groups: Games to Use in Workshops, Meetings and the Community
http://www.aidsalliance.org/assets/000/001/052/ene0502_Energiser_guide_eng_original.pdf?1413808298

Partners for Your Empowerment: Workshop Activities/Icebreakers – A twenty-three page booklet chockfull of exercises.
http://pyeglobal.org/workshop-activities-icebreakers/

September 22 is Elephant Appreciation Day. Here are some stories to celebrate these gentle giants.

And Elephants Did Fly - Southern Orissa, India

The Blind Man and the Elephant - India

The Elephant and the Dog – Bhutan

The Elephant and the Mahout – Magadha/Ancient India

Elephant and Tortoise – South Africa

Fearing the Wind - India

How the Elephant Got His Tusks - Africa

The Tortoise and the Elephant - Nigeria

The Tortoise Captures the Elephant - Africa

The Elephants Nose – India

Story-lovers.com – More elephant information than you can shake your trunk at!

Curriculum for the classroom to complement Elephant Appreciation Day.


The Elephant Sanctuary – Two units focusing on the study of elephants offering teaching and learning activities for children grades K-8 consisting of  72 pages of instruction, background information, charts and graphs, activities, etc.
http://www.elephants.com/curriculum.php

September 7 is Labor Day in the United States. In this blog post I offer you some multicultural folktales about workers around the world to add to your repertoire. You will also find crafts, curriculum resources, and some history of the holiday.

Labor Day: A Tribute to the American Worker

Something Extra

The link below was not part of the original Storytelling Magazine article. However, since then I have written a new blog, Putting Your Proposal Pieces Together; I think it will be a useful complement to the above resources.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2016/05/putting-your-proposal-pieces-together.html

Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2016 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Celebrating Ramadan


Public Prayer in the Mosqueby Jean-Léon Gerome
(French, Vesoul 1824–1904 Paris
)


Ramadan began on June 5, 2016 and continues to July 5, 2016. * The Islamic calendar is lunar and the days begin at sunset, so there may be one-day error depending on when the New Moon is first seen.

Ramadan is intended to teach Muslims about patience, spirituality, humility and submissiveness to God. Below are some stories to celebrate Ramadan.







STORIES


Patience

Helping Young Plants Grow - Taiwan
http://tinyurl.com/d978wpc


The Hidden
 One - Native American
http://tinyurl.com/c8ms28q


Patience-Stone and Patience-Knife – Turkey

http://tinyurl.com/c5yzxeo


The Tiger’s Whisker
 – Korea
https://www.storiestogrowby.org/story/tigers-whisker/


Humility


Forty Fortunes
 – Iran
http://tinyurl.com/bwbp9sm

The Magic Horse 
- Iran
https://www.storiestogrowby.org/story/magic-horse/

The Magic of Muskil
 Gusha - Iran
http://tinyurl.com/cw7lu8s

Poverty and Humility Lead to Heaven - Germany

http://tinyurl.com/6m4vj3l


Wisdom Commons.org
 - Eight tales of humility from around the world.
http://tinyurl.com/cyl8cnt


Spirituality 


The Singing Fir Tree - Switzerland
http://www.fairytalechannel.org/2008/03/singing-fir-tree.html


BOOKS

6 Favorite Children’s Books About Ramadan http://www.incultureparent.com/2013/07/6-favorite-childrens-books-about-ramadan/


C
URRICULUM

Celebrating Ramadan – A resource for K-12 educators.
http://muslimsinmichigan.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/0
4/celebratingramadan.pdf



History.com – Learn more about the history of Ramadan.
http://www.history.com/topics/holidays/ramadan


CRAFTS


DLTK-kids- Countries and Cultures Crafts for Kids: Islamic/Muslim
http://www.dltk-kids.com/world/muslim/





Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web links may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.



Karen Chace 2016 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.


Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Putting Your Proposal Pieces Together




Through the years I have served on numerous proposal review committees for a variety of organizations. When I attend their conferences I often hear, “I wonder why my proposal wasn’t accepted.”

While I have presented at a number of conferences I have also been on the receiving end of, "Thank you for your submission but you have not been selected to present this year."

Have I made mistakes? Absolutely! I don’t claim to be an expert, but I thought I would offer some insights based on my committee experience. Please consider the following suggestions, offered with a gentle hand, the next time you submit a proposal for either a local or national conference.

Ask Yourself:


  • Is it well written? If a reviewer knows nothing about your work or the subject, would they understand your process?
  • Have you submitted the same proposal for many years without offering anything new?
  • If the conference has a theme does your proposal complement it?
  • Did you spell check?
  • If you presented at the same conference in the past were you flexible to work with before and during the conference? 
  • If you previously presented did you follow through with items the conference coordinator requested? Examples:
  1. Sending your signed contract back on time.
  2. Registering for the conference on time.
  3. Did you respond to queries from the conference coordinator in a timely fashion? 
  4. Did you promote the conference, and your workshop, if it was a requirement of your contract? (Organizers do notice.)
Submission Guidelines

  1. Did you provide a workshop outline?
  2. Did you provide a timeline breakdown for your presentation    For example:  % of lecture, % for Q & A, % of participation. (Note: One and two are not the same.)
  3. Is your math correct for the above? Do your percentages equal 100%?
  4. Did you adhere to the word limit for your bio/outline/workshop description/resume?
  5. Did you offer complete references, including their contact information?
  6. Did you indicate where you have presented before? Don’t state, "I have presented at conferences around the country” and assume that is sufficient.
  7. Did you request equipment the conference does not provide, as stated on the proposal form?

 Conversely:
  • Don't send a resume if it is not requested. Reviewers do not have the time to read more.
  • Don't add quotes from other workshop participants unless requested. Again, reviewers don't have the time to read more.
  • Don’t submit a four hour proposal and state, “I can also do this as a 90 minute presentation if necessary.” Instead, send in a second, full proposal for the 90 minute time slot. Reviewers want to know what will be different in a shorter and/or longer time slot.
  • Don't ask for a deadline extension.  The conference organizers are usually on a very tight timetable and the deadline is there for a reason.
  • Don’t use a variety of fonts or ink colors on your proposal; they make it difficult for the reviewers to read.
  • Don’t indicate a link to your website in place of requested information; answer the questions.
Before you submit your proposal:

  • Review it again.
  • Make sure all of the questions are answered.
  • Check the spelling.
  • Check the word count.
  • Ask someone who doesn't know your work to read over your proposal. A second set of eyes is always helpful to catch spelling errors and ambiguities.  
  • Review it again before you hit the send button.

Below are examples from actual proposal submissions:

  • Applicant ran out of room on the first page, which was handwritten. Instead of attaching a second page, they wrote around the edge of the first page, in circular fashion, numerous times.
  • Applicant attached a letter indicating their displeasure at not being selected the previous year.
  • Applicant only offered names in the reference section stating, “You know how to reach them.”
  • Applicant attached a letter stating, “If you don’t like this proposal I have others” and offered only the titles of the other workshops.
  • Applicant stated that they deserved to be selected as they were "a long standing member of the professional community.”
  • Applicant chastised the conference organizer, on their proposal form, for not offering expensive technical equipment they wanted for their presentation.

Your proposal tells reviewers a lot about you as a presenter, your professionalism, and the way your workshop might flow. If you are not paying attention to the proposal guidelines, deadlines, and other requirements, what else might fall by the wayside? Remember, there are always a number of reviewers and they may have no knowledge of you or your work. Always assume you are making a first impression and make it a good one.

You may do everything right and still not be selected to present your work. Don’t take it personally. Some years your proposal may not be a good fit with the overall arc of the conference. Other times you may need to ask yourself, what can I do different next year?

SOMETHING EXTRA


If you are presenting at a conference, my friend Bill Lampton, President of  Championship Communications, recently shared this article; terrific advice from entrepreneur Duane Cummings.






Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web links may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2016 ©

Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to this blog post via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.


Monday, May 9, 2016

Slicing Up Your Story: Story Board

Children Eating a Pie
by
Bartolome Esteban Murillo, 1670-1675
I like to use a variety of both written and interactive tools to help my students learn the art of Oral Tradition, telling stories! There are already several wonderful books with useful ideas, however, because many of my students return year after year, I always want to have something new and fresh for them to try.

While I use the traditional story board to help students break down their tales, and also created, What's Driving Your Story? (Available in my book, Story by Story), this year I designed another type of story board, Slicing Up Your Story. I use this towards the end of the program, long after they completed their initial story boards and were very familiar with their stories. I wanted to see if anything new bubbled to the surface and also how succinctly they could now describe different elements of their story, i.e. setting, character, events, etc. Below is the handout I used along with some of the answers the students shared.

Please feel free to use this in your own personal work; however I do request that you respect copyright, offer attribution, and do not publish it in any form without my permission. Note: You may share the link to this blog post with your colleagues.



SLICING UP YOUR STORY INSTRUCTIONS

Before I pass out the worksheet I go over the instructions with the students, using Little Red Riding Hood as an example.

1.      Who is the main character in your story? (Red Riding Hood)
2.      Describe one character in two words. (petite, brave)
3.      Describe the story setting in three words. (dark, damp, ominous)
4.      Describe the main event/problem in four words. ( Girl meets dangerous wolf)
5.      Describe something in your story using ONLY ONE of your five senses. Describe the wolf using the sense of touch: hairy, dry, coarse, solid, muscular) Note: Be careful to clearly explain that you are looking for descriptive words.
6.      Describe the ending of your story in six words. (Woodsman rescues girl and grandmother.) *Of course this might be different if you are using another variant of the story. 


WORKSHEET


COMMENTS FROM ACTUAL STUDENT WORKSHEETS
#2. Describe the main character in two words.
  • Tiny/Forgetful
  • Cross/Selfish
  • Prankster/Beggar
  • Greedy/Thoughtless

#3. Describe the story setting in three words.
  • Sweet/Warm/Stone
  • Pretty/Colorful/Fragrant
  • Cold/Winter/Damp 
  • Green/Glistening/Well
#4. Describe the main event/problem in four words.
  • Sister, spell, fairy, curse
  • Monkey loses his tail.
  • Cat wants delicious cake.
  • Girl won’t share bread.
  • Tom wants leprechaun's gold.
#5. Describe something in your story using only one of your five senses.
  • Taste: Frosting: vanilla, sugary, delicious, rich
  • Sight: Cloud: high, white, fluffy, drifting
  • Taste: Bread: sweet, warm, buttery
  • Touch: Bucket: cold, smooth, shiny
  • Smell: Farm: animals, manure, flowers, fresh air
 #6. Describe the ending of your story in six words.
  • Tries to chase his baby donkey.
  • Sadly Tom doesn’t get the gold.
  • Nasty sister turns into an owl.
  • Be careful what you wish for.
  • Happy monkey gets his tail back.
Extra Bonus: Leave a comment on the blog and I will send you the actual worksheet in a .doc file so you won't have to make one up yourself. (I am not above bribery :)

If you are interested in more innovative storytelling tools and games, you will find them in my award-winning book, Story by Story: Creating a Student Storytelling Troupe.I hope you will have the opportunity to try this out with your students or even when you are learning a new story. If you do, please let me know, I would love to hear how it turned out for you.

Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web links may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2016 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you

Thursday, March 10, 2016

Step Up to the Story Plate! Interactive Storytelling Game


Personal photo: My son playing
baseball as a young child.
I believe that learning and play go hand in hand. The wonderful Fred Rogers said,

“Play is often talked about as if it were a relief from serious learning. But for children play is serious learning. Play is really the work of childhood."

I agree with his sentiment and add play to all of my storytelling residencies.
Each week, when I meet with my student storytelling troupe, I add an interactive game that is fun and also reinforces their storytelling skills. Over the years I have created a number of original games but I am always trying to come up with a new idea, and sometimes inspiration strikes in the strangest places!

Last week I was in the Dollar Store, picking up craft items for my Mass Humanities program when I spotted a set of baseball bases and began to think, “How I could use them as an interactive storytelling game?”  On the next aisle I noticed some white felt Easter baskets with a baseball design; this was too much of a coincidence! I bought the bases and buckets.

Over the weekend I brainstormed a bit and came up with the following interactive relay game, Step Up to the Story Plate, which my fourth and fifth grade students played for the first time this week. The game was a great success! The students were wildly cheering each other on; we had time to play it twice and they asked to play it again next week. It is a great game for helping them think on their feet, while reinforcing their story skills and comradery. While the set up and rules below may sound complicated, I assure you it is an easy game to set up and play.

I offer it here for you to use in your personal storytelling work. It is not to be published in any form without permission although you may share the blog link with your colleagues. I ask that you respect copyright and offer attribution whenever you use it. Batter up!

STEP UP TO THE STORY PLATE! © 2016
SUPPLIES




  • This is a relay game so you need two sets of plastic baseball bases. If you can’t find them to purchase, make your own out of cardboard.
  • Eight buckets to hold the questions at each base, three for each game, and two buckets to hold the dice at Home plate. I found the buckets above at the Dollar Store but you could use anything at your disposal.
  • A set of large, foam dice, found at the Dollar Store.
  • Green Card Stock to print out the questions. (Of course I used green, for the Green Monster in Fenway Park, home of the Boston Red Sox, but you can choose a different color.)

QUESTIONS

I came up with these questions but you can design your own. Nine questions for the nine innings in baseball, three extra questions just for fun. 

1.      Speak one line of dialogue from your story, using EMOTION!
2.      Share two gestures from your story. EXAGGERATE them!
3.      Describe the main setting of your story in three words.
4.      Describe a character in FOUR words.
5.      Tell your story in FIVE words.
6.      Show TWO FACIAL expressions from your story.
7.      Speak the FIRST sentence of your story.
8.      Introduce yourself and your story title WITH CONFIDENCE!
9.      Speak the LAST sentence of your story and take a bow!
10.  Steal one base.
11.  Steal two bases.
12.  Do the wave three times. 

SET UP

You will need a large space to lay out both sets of bases. Of course you don’t need to set them up the same distance as a regular baseball diamond but there should be enough room teams aren’t bumping into each other.

  • Arrange the two sets of baseball bases side by side. Make sure there is enough room for the students to run and move.
  • Place one bucket at each home plate with one die in each bucket.
  • Place questions in buckets at bases 1, 2, and 3. Make sure each set of buckets has the same questions and number of questions. For example, you have twelve questions, which equals four questions in each of their base buckets. Each bucket should have the same questions to make if fair for each relay team. For example, both first base buckets might have the following questions:

    1. Speak one line of dialogue from your story, using EMOTION!
    2. Share two gestures from your story. EXAGGERATE them!
    3. Describe the main setting of your story in three words.
    4. Describe a character in FOUR words.

§ 
RULES/DIRECTIONS

Go over the questions and rules with your students before they begin the game. If you have an assistant in your class, they can “coach” one relay team, while you help the other if they need assistance. When each student rolls the dice you need to be there to remind them what to do if they roll a #5 or #6. The others are self explanatory. The first team to finish wins the game!


This is a basic relay game, form two lines with the same amount of students. The first student in each line picks their foam dice out of the bucket at home plate, rolls the dice and moves through the game according to the number they rolled.


DICE NUMBERS SIGNIFY:
  • Number 1 – First Base
  • Number 2 – Second Base
  • Number 3 – Third Base
  • Number 4 – Homerun!
  • Number 5 – Pinch Hitter
  • Number 6 – Pinch Runner

TASKS RELATED TO EACH NUMBER

  • Student rolls #1: Runs to first base, picks a question from the bucket and perform task. Runs to second base, picks a question from the bucket and performs the task, and so on until they reach home plate, tags next player.
  • Student rolls #2:  Runs to second base, picks question from the bucket, performs task. Runs to third base, picks another question, performs task, runs to home plate, tags next player.
  • Student rolls #3 :  Runs to third base,  picks a question from the bucket, performs the task, runs to home plate, tags next player.
  • Student rolls #4: Student runs all of the bases without stopping to home plate.
  • Student rolls #5: Pinch Hitter: Student goes to the back of the line and the next student moves up. This is a disadvantage for the relay team as it adds another turn to their relay team.
  • Student rolls #6: Pinch Runner: Student steps aside, the next student in line steps up and runs to second base. This is an advantage to the team as the first student who rolled #6 is automatically finished with their turn. This relay team is one person ahead.


If you are interested in more original, interactive games, as well as story worksheets, please consider my award-winning book, Story by Story: Creating a Student Storytelling Troupe. I am also offering a brand new workshop, Story Play, at the LANES Sharing the Fire Conference on Saturday, April 2, 2016. You will learn additional activities not found in my book, to help both you and your students. For all of the conference information go to www.lanes.org .






Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web links may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.


Karen Chace 2016 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.


Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Celebrate National Pig Day: Stories, Songs, and More!


Pig and Pepper
from Alice's Wonderland Adventures
Illustration by Andrew Rackham, 1922

March 1 is National Pig Day; a day devoted to celebrating their place as one of man’s most intellectual and domesticated animals. Below you will find stories, songs, fingerplays, crafts and book suggestions to make the  most of this day!

STORIES


The Dog and the Pig - Indiahttp://tinyurl.com/oa5r8hu

The Enchanted Pig – Andrew Lang
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/lfb/re/refb11.htm

The Pig That Went to Church - United States
http://tinyurl.com/oo9bznc

The Old Woman and Her Pig - England
http://tinyurl.com/8yagce3

The Sheep and the Pig Who Set Up House - Norway
http://oaks.nvg.org/ntales47.html

The Story of the Three Little Pigs - England

http://www.authorama.com/english-fairy-tales-16.html


The Three Green Men of Glen Nevis - Scotland
http://tinyurl.com/osz569v

FINGERPLAYS

Two Mother Pigs
Two mother pigs lived in a pen (show thumbs)
Each had four babies, and that made ten (show fingers and thumbs)
These four babies were soft and pink (hold up one hand, four fingers up)
These four babies were black as ink (hold up other hand, four fingers up)
All eight babies loved to play
And they rolled, and they rolled, in the mud all day. (roll hands over each other)
At night, with their mothers, they curled up in a heap, (make fists)
And squealed and squealed until they went...to...sleep. (turn fists over, palms up)


Five Little Pigs
Five little pigs rolled in the mud, (hold up five fingers then roll hands over each other)
Squishy, squashy, felt so good. (squish hands together left and right)
The farmer took one pig out. (pretend to take one out)
Oink, Oink, Oink, the pig did shout.  (Repeat with4,3,2,1)

No little pigs rolled in the mud, (shake head and index finger “no.”)
They all looked clean and good. (look at self and smile)
The farmer turned his back and then, (look behind)
Those pigs rolled in the mud again! (roll hands over each other)


SONGS/STORY STRETCH

Barnyard Song (Tune: If you're happy and you know it)

If you're a pig and you know it say oink, oink
If you’re a pig and you know it say oink, oink
If you’re a pig and you know it and you really want to show it
If you’re a pig and you know it say oink, oink 

If you’re a cow and you know it say moo, moo…
If you’re a cat and you know it climb a tree…
If you’re a horse and you know it gallop around…
If you’re a dog and you know bark out loud…
If you’re a bird and you know it flap your wings…
If you’re a pig and you know roll in the mud…

Three Pigs Rap
This is the story about three pigs
Who needed to go out and get new digs.
Each set out on his own way
To build himself a place to stay
“I'm a lazy pig. I need time to play.
I am building a house of hay!”

Now that didn't work out for too long
Soon he heard the wolf sing his song
“I'll huff and I'll puff” (He'll huff and he'll puff)
“I'll huff and I'll puff and I'll blow your house down!”

Then the pig heard this real loud sound.
He blew the house down
Off he went, off he ran
To see if his brother had a better plan

“When I saw my brother and heard him cry,
I said, Let's give a house of wood a try‟
They built the house; they built it strong,
But soon the wolf came along

“I'll huff and I'll puff” (He'll huff and he‟ll puff)
“I'll huff and I'll puff and I'll blow your house down”
Then the pigs heard this real loud sound.
He blew the house down.
Off they went, Off they ran
To see if their sister had a better plan.
“Now come my brothers, you look so sick.
Come and stay in my house of brick

The wolf can blow, but it will do no good.
You can't blow stone like hay or wood.”
The wolf came. He gave a huff and puff.
Soon he learned that it wasn't enough
It's best he learned to leave others alone
When they are safely in their homes!
http://freesongsforkids.com/audios/three-pigs-rap

Three Pigs In A Bed
There were three pigs in a bed,
And the little one said,
"Roll over, roll over".
So they all rolled over and one fell out!

Repeat with two pigs

One pig in the bed,
And you know what he said?
I've got the whole mattress to myself!


To Market, To Market
To Market, to market to buy a fat pig
Home again, home again jiggity jig.
To market, to market to buy a fat hog
Home again, home again, jiggity jog.

BOOKS

Children’s Books About Pigs: Funny Bedtime Stories

http://hubpages.com/family/The-10-Best-Childrens-Books-About-Pigs-Funny-Bedtime-Stories


CRAFTS

Dltk- kids
– Lots of fun pig crafts here that will have you squealing in no time at all.
http://www.dltk-kids.com/animals/pigs.htm


SOMETHING EXTRA

Literacy Tip:
Pack a book. Tuck a storybook or two in the diaper bag and in the car for the older infant, toddler, and preschooler. The habit of filling in life's spaces with books and always having books handy helps a child see them as a regular part of life. 
http://www.pampers.com/Ready-to-Read:-Literacy-Tips-for-Toddlers--and-Preschoolers                                                                          



Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.



Karen Chace 2016 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.