Friday, August 24, 2018

Stor e Telling Winter 2017: Peace and Justice



Justice and Peace
by
Corrado Giaquinto
1703 - 1765

“Peace and justice are two sides of the same coin.” - Dwight D. Eisenhower

This is the final Stor e Telling installment for 2017. This column was for the winter issue and its theme was Peace and Justice. I offer resources below to complement the theme along with fingerplays, songs and stories to complement the winter months.

American Friends Service Committee - “Founded in 1917, the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) is a Quaker organization that promotes lasting peace with justice, as a practical expression of faith in action.”
https://www.afsc.org/ 

American Friends Service Committee: Peace Works - Inspirational stories connected to the above organization; search by decade, topic or location.
http://peaceworks.afsc.org/

YES Magazine – Many of you may have read some of their powerful articles on social media. There are sections on Teaching Peace and Justice, This Planet, Economy, People Power, and Happiness; stories that will make your heart smile.
http://tinyurl.com/yazay2x6

United Network of Young Peace Builders: 25 Stories for Peace The book … is the culmination of a year of celebrating youth in peacebuilding…we want to honor the work of young peacebuilders around the globe, by giving them a space to tell their story.”
http://tinyurl.com/yajzc4ks

Two bibliographies featuring books about peace building and conflict transformation.

Conflict Transformation and Peace Building: A Selected Bibliography
“…a short list of book for young children on peace, justice, kindness, courage optimism and other virtues.” There are additional resources as well.
Stories of peace, justice, and being judged.
How Violence is Ended – Buddhist Legend
http://tinyurl.com/yc3ku4qg

United Network of Young Peace Builders: 25 Stories for Peace
– In celebration of their 25th anniversary this publication of personal stories was compiled in “honor of the work of young peacebuilders around the globe”, by giving them a space to tell their story
http://tinyurl.com/yajzc4ks

When the Hyena and the Billy Goat Signed a Peace Treaty - Chad

When the Twins Went to War – Russia

Wisdom Commons – Five folktales focused on the topic of justice.

The Bell of Justice – Variants of the same folktale from different countries.

The Blossom Tree - Tibet

The Cruel Creditor and the Judge’s Wise Daughter - Morocco

The Fire on the Hill - Africa

The Legend of the Peace Pipes – Native American/Arikara

The Lion’s Wedding – India
http://tinyurl.com/yba5v5kt

The Nodding Tiger - China

The Peace Queen – Native American/Iroquois

Poetic Justice - Persia

The Shepherd Judge

A few tales to light your way through the dark winter nights.

The Little Girl and the Winter Whirlwinds - Bulgaria

The Winter Ross - Germany
http://tinyurl.com/ybgk8j4y

The Winter Spirit and His Visitor – Native American Folktale
http://tinyurl.com/ycuohwhb

Winter Melon Boy - Hmong
http://tinyurl.com/y8xkpesg

Celebrating Snow with the Small Ones – From my own blog, a post filled with fingerplays, songs, and more to delight the children in your winter lapsit program.
http://tinyurl.com/ybdy79mg


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2018 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.



Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Shower Your Story With Similes: A Storytelling Worksheet

Rainy Day in Paris
by
Gustave Caillebotte, 1877
I am always searching for new ways to help my storytelling students connect with their stories and make them their own. I use a variety of worksheets I created, which can be found in my book, Story by Story: Creating a StudentStorytelling Troupe. However, since I have returning students from year to year I try to offer something new and fresh.

Recently I asked them to work with their stories, adding a few similes using the
 worksheet I created below. Here are some of the examples my fourth and fifth grade students added to their stories, the simile portions are underlined.


  • So he took out his slingshot and shot the sparrow with the aim of a skilled archer.
  • With the roar of a lion he demanded to know how he had become rich so suddenly.
  • As quick as a squirrel the older brother began to climb, and climb, and climb.
  • The woods were as dark as an evil castle.
  • She went home as sad as a dog without food.
  • As softly as a mouse she asked her, “Do you see him? Do you see my brother?”
  • Her face healed as fast as butter melted.
  • In days long ago, the sky was as close to Earth as a little boy is to his mother.

It was a good exercise for them to further visualize details about their characters and setting

Please feel free to use the worksheet below in your personal work with your students. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without written permission. (Please refer to full copyright statement at the end of the blog post.)



Karen Chace 2018 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Storytelling World: Stor e Telling Spring 2017

Spring Flowers (Peonies)
William Merritt Chase, 1889 
Time to share my second Storytelling Magazine column from 2017. The theme for this issue was Storytelling World. Get ready to visit Ceylon, India, England, Africa, Wales and other ports of call.

The magazine is a membership benefit of the National Storytelling Network.  If you are interested in getting fabulous articles from around the world, featuring renowned storytellers and educators, along with my most recent column, join us at 
www.storynet.org.  I will not be sharing anything from the 2018 publications until 2019 rolls around. 

I would be delighted to know if you find something useful to add to your repertoire.

STORIES

The Animal Story Book by Andrew Lang, 1914 – Among the stories you will find within are What Elephants Can Do, The Taming of an Otter, The Story of a Weasel, and more.
English Fairy and Other Folk Tales by Edwin Sidney Hartland, 1890 – A collection of historical and local tales, complemented by goblins, faeries, goblins, and drolls!
http://tinyurl.com/kvg8kj

Eskimo Folktales
by Knud Rasmussen, 1921 – Fifty-two stories “collected in various parts of Greenland, taken down from the lips of the Eskimo story-tellers themselves.”

http://tinyurl.com/ht6jox8


Hawaiian Legends of Ghosts and Ghost-Gods
collected and translated by W.D. Westervelt, 1916 – “The legends of the Hawaiian Islands are valuable…they reveal an understanding of the phenomena of nature and unveil their early history with its mythological setting.”
http://tinyurl.com/hw32wxh

Myths and Legends of All Nations by Logan Marshall, 1914 - Stories from Greece, Germany, Scandinavia, Italy and more.
http://tinyurl.com/hkosa5v

Tales of the Sun or Folktales from Southern India by Mrs. Howard Kingscote and Paṇḍit Naṭêsá Sástrî, 1890 – Twenty-six chapters filled with eclectic folktales.
https://www.gutenberg.org/files/37002/37002-h/37002-h.htm

Village Folktales of Ceylon by Henry Parker, 1914 – You will find The Turtle Prince, The Wax Horse, The Story of the Cobra’s Bite, and more within these pages.
http://tinyurl.com/jjhr4a7

Welsh Fairy-Tales and Other Stories by P.H. Emerson, 1891. Twenty four tales await. Come visit with The Old Man and the Fairies, meet Billy Duffy and the Devil, and many more. http://tinyurl.com/htyvhtb

March 21 is Tea for Two Tuesday. Legend tells us that tea was discovered in China in 2737 BC by the Emperor Shen Nung, when the leaves of a wild tea bush accidentally fell into a pot of boiling water.

The Accomplished and Lucky Tea-Kettle - Japan
http://tinyurl.com/gprhlhc

The Ancestor of Tea – Chinese Folktale
http://tinyurl.com/gudo3vz

The Ghost’s Tea Kettle – Yupik
http://tinyurl.com/jz3vmmk

Learning to Act - India
http://tinyurl.com/jmzo8nl

The Samurai and the Tea Master – Japan
You can listen to the audio or read the story at this link.
http://tinyurl.com/jevklty

The Tea-Kettle – Japan
Verdant Tea – Legends associated with tea.
http://tinyurl.com/hnxzshx

April 17 is National Bat Appreciation Day so start flapping your wings!

Bedfordshire Bat Group – Seventeen bat folktales from around the world.
http://tinyurl.com/hzmbxx3

April 14 is International Moment of Laughter Day; time to tickle your funny bone!

American Folklore: Funny Stories – Forty-nine folktales to make you smile.
http://tinyurl.com/7fskn4p

Fools Cannot Count Themselves – Five variants of this Noodlehead tale.
http://tinyurl.com/ze9l9hf

The Fools of Spring
http://tinyurl.com/zxljjpy

Hans, Who Made the Princess Laugh
http://tinyurl.com/ok9tkxu

Till Eulenspiegel in the Tower 
http://tinyurl.com/zuwg9jb

Till Eulenspiegel Finds A Cure
http://tinyurl.com/j2lb9lk

SOMETHING EXTRA

In case you missed the first installment from 2017 you will find the link below.

Stor e Telling January/February/March 2017: Stories – Impacting Speaker and Listener
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2018/01/stories-impacting-speaker-and-listener.html

At the link below you will find the blog which lists all of the columns I wrote in 2016, each with a synopsis to help you find what you may be seeking. At the end of the blog you will also find links to all of the columns from 2002 – 2015. At the time they were posted all of the links were active. If you find a dead link please let me know and I will do my best to find the updated source.

1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources IV: Stor e Telling 2016

http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/09/1001-nights-to-2001-story-resources-iv.html

Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.


Karen Chace 2018 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Friday, January 26, 2018

South Korea: Folktales, Curriculum, and More

Yolgok Buddha
Joseon Dynasty, 1684
This year the Winter Olympics take place in PyeongChang, South Korea. Below you will find tidbits about their place in the world, their stories, and some crafts and curriculum to bring the Olympics, and the people of this country to your classroom. Let’s hit the slopes!
- South Korea, or the Republic of Korea, is in East Asia. It   occupies the southern half of the Korean Peninsula, below North Korea.

- Korea is one of the most ethnically homogeneous countries in the world.

- There are five Royal Palaces in Seoul, built by the Joseon kings who ruled for 500 years from 1392.

- Kimchi, the nation’s favourite dish, is made with fermented vegetables such as cabbage. It is served to accompany most meals and is said to help prevent bird flu.

- Korean babies are one year old on the day that they are born, then add another year on New Year’s Day.

- The Korean alphabet is called Hangul. It has 10 vowels and 14 consonants and is easy to learn for young children.

- Korean schools use robots to teach English! They have a computer screen which shows the face of a teacher, who can be sitting in another country whilst helping children to learn!

- The Korean martial art taekwondo is the national sport. Unsurprisingly Koreans have won the most Olympic gold medals.
From: https://www.activityvillage.co.uk/south-korea

STORIES

The Devoted Daughter – Korea

The Fairy and the Woodcutter

KBS World Radio: Korean Folktales – Nineteen pages filled with stories!

Korean Folk Tales: Imps, Ghosts and Fairies by James S. Gale, 1913. Visit with Ten Thousand Devils, The Awful Little Goblin, and more mysterious creatures from Korea.
http://chestofbooks.com/fairy-tale/Korean/

The Story Spirits



The ski resort known as Yongpyong (Dragon Valley) is home to the snow sports for the Olympic Games in 2018 so of course I must share some dragon tales!

Dragons: Mythical Mystical, Magical Creatures
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2011/05/dragons-mythical-mystical-magical.html


BOOKS

15 Great Korean Folktales for Kids
https://www.pragmaticmom.com/2017/06/korean-folk-tales/


CHILDREN’S CRAFTS/ACTIVITIES

Graphing the Winter Olympics Bulletin Board
  
Kidssoup – Pyeongchang South Korea Olympic Games Kids Activities and Game

Korean Board Game - Yut-Nori 

Olympic Paper Chain Countdown – I LOVE this idea. Perfect for home or the classroom.
Olympic Ring Bottle Cap Sorter – Great way to help toddlers with colors, sorting and sizes.
Read Write Think – Classroom Resources and Activities: Winter Olympics

Traditional Sam Taeguk Fan


SOMETHING EXTRA

26 Korean Foods Everyone Need to Try

Festival, Celebrations and Holidays

Korea’s Fairy Tale Village is a Truly Magical Place That You Have to Visit

Traditional Origami Paper Folding in Korea


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2018 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.



Thursday, January 11, 2018

Stories - Impacting Speaker and Listener: Stor e Telling January February March 2017

Chanticleer and Dan Russell
by Frank Adams, 1920
The New Year is here and it is time to begin sharing my Storytelling Magazine columns from 2017. The magazine is a membership benefit of the National Storytelling Network.  If you are interested in getting fabulous articles from around the world, featuring renowned storytellers and educators, along with my most recent column, join us at www.storynet.org.  I will not be sharing anything from any 2018 publications until 2019 rolls around.

This issue focused on the varied ways stories impact the speaker and the listener. Below are a few articles and a TEDX talk to add to the discussion.

The Importance of Telling Our Stories “Telling our stories is not an end in itself, but an attempt to release ourselves from them, to evolve and grow beyond them.”
http://tinyurl.com/zs53bwq

The Power of Being Relatable - An interesting article on the use of story in business by young entrepreneurs.
http://tinyurl.com/kzugzaa

The Science of Storytelling: What Listening to a Story Does To Our Brains - Exciting research on how the teller and the listener’s brain synchronize.

This Is Your Brain on Communication –  A TEDX talk by neuroscientist Uri Hasson who “researches the basis of human communication, and experiments from his lab reveal that even across different languages, our brains show similar activity, or become "aligned," when we hear the same idea or story.
http://tinyurl.com/gpmzhts

Your Brain on Fiction – “Brain scans are revealing what happens in our heads when we read a detailed description, an evocative metaphor or an emotional exchange between characters. Stories, this research is showing, stimulate the brain and even change how we act in life.”

On January 28 the Chinese New Year begins and 2017 is The Year of the Rooster. Below are some tales to add to the celebration.

The Brave Rooster - Latvia

The Cat and the Rooster – Ukraine
http://tinyurl.com/zdscqm4

The Fighting Roosters and the Eagle – Aesop
http://tinyurl.com/owgvab4

The Frankfurt Rooster - Germany

Half Rooster – Albania  
http://tinyurl.com/htks8xl

The Old Woman’s Rooster - Aesop

The Polecat and the Rooster - Khmer

Reynard and Chanticleer - Norway

The Rooster - Ethiopia

The Rooster and the Pearl – Aesop
http://tinyurl.com/gvmvdy9

The Rooster’s Lament – China
http://tinyurl.com/j3cedn7

Storie of Cinderlaras - Indonesia

The Tale of the Golden Cockerel - Russia

The Weathercock on St. Stephen’s Cathedral - Austria

March 1 is National Pig Day, devoted to celebrating their place as one of man’s most intellectual and domesticated animals.

The Dog and the Pig - India
http://tinyurl.com/oa5r8hu

The Enchanted Pig – Andrew Lang
http://tinyurl.com/z9owtnk 

The Pig That Went to Church - United States

The Old Woman and Her Pig - England

The Sheep and the Pig Who Set Up House - Norway
http://tinyurl.com/j5xjj2r

The Story of the Three Little Pigs - England
http://tinyurl.com/b979cte

The Three Green Men of Glen Nevis - Scotland

April 15 is Husband Appreciation Day so of course you must have some stories to share!

The Clever Husband and Wife - Philippines

The Husband Who Was to Mind the House – Norway
http://tinyurl.com/hvam3qe

The Jealous Husband - Roma

The Mermaid’s Comb – Cornish
http://tinyurl.com/h49hb5s

Three Feathers - England
SOMETHING EXTRA
 
At the link below you will find the blog which lists all of the columns I wrote in 2016, each with a synopsis to help you find what you may be seeking. At the end of the blog you will also find links to all of the columns from 2002 – 2015. At the time they were posted all of the links were active. If you find a dead link please let me know and I will do my best to find the updated source.

1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources IV: Stor e Telling 2016

http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/09/1001-nights-to-2001-story-resources-iv.html

 

Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2018 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.