Thursday, January 12, 2017

From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources III: Stor e Telling 2015

Scheherazade and a Quest
by
Abu'l-Hasan Khan
Ghaffari Kashani (1814–1866)
The tale of the Persian beauty Scheherazade is one all storytellers are familiar with, a woman who saved her own life by sharing 1000 stories by the end of 1001 nights.

I began writing the Stor e Telling column for Storytelling Magazine in 2002 and since then I have reviewed well over 2001 storytelling and educational websites, as well as individual folktales, fairy tales, myths and legends.


Below are the columns I wrote in 2015, each with a synopsis to help you find what you may be seeking in case your time is limited.

At the end of the blog you will also find links to all of the columns from 2002 – 2014. At the time they were posted all of the links were active. If you find a dead link please let me know and I will do my best to find the updated source.

 

I hope you find something useful and fun to add to your storytelling repertoire or classroom, business enterprises or school curriculum. As always, I appreciate any comments you wish to share. Happy surfing! 


Stor e Telling  January February 2015: Drama
There are resources on theme of drama, folktales to celebrate the ‘roar’ of March, fairy to celebrate Tell a Fairy Tale Day and more.

Stor e Telling March April May 2015: National Storytelling Conference
Celebrate with stories! Victoria Day in Canada, Go Fishing Day in the USA, and resources to help you find your way to fun at the National Storytelling Conference in Missouri. (The conference is being held there again this year so the information will still be useful.)
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2016/01/stor-e-telling-march-april-may-2015.html

Stor e Telling June July 2015: Bilingual Storytelling
Bilingual stories and resources, including downloadable books, activities and lesson plans. Also, tales to celebrate Aunt and Uncle Day in the USA, and myths, legends, Sufi, Buddhist tales and many more.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2016/02/bilingual-storytelling-stor-e-telling.html

Stor e Telling August September 2015: Workshops
Planning to submit a workshop proposal in 2017? You will find a number of resources to help you get that coveted ‘You have been accepted” letter. Want to offer a virtual workshop? You will find Skype three tutorials also resources to guide you through learning curve. There are also links to icebreakers, always a great tool to use in workshops. There are also stories and curriculum to celebrate Elephant Appreciation Day!
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2016/09/stor-e-telling-august-september-2015.html

Stor e Telling October November December: Fairy Tales
Of course, since the theme for this issue was fairy tales you will find three public domain books filled with wonder. There are other tales to herald World Kindness Day, delicious stories about fall apples that pack a tasty crunch, and more!
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2016/12/stor-e-telling-october-november.html


If you are interested in the previous Stor e Telling columns I posted you will find them all at the links below:

From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources II: Stor e Telling 2014


From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources: Stor e Telling 2013
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/06/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html

Stor e Telling Columns: 2007 to 2012 with Synopses
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/stor-e-telling-columns-2007-to-2012.html

In addition, all of my Stor e Telling columns in Storytelling Magazine from 2002-2006 are listed on the Publication’s Page on my website. One caveat, I have not had the opportunity to recheck all of the links; that is a project for another day. You will find a point and click extravaganza of story research here: http://storybug.net/stor-e-telling.html



Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web links may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2017 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Adding Actions and Adjectives: Storytelling Worksheet

For the past 15 years I have been working with students, teaching them the art of Oral Tradition. They choose their own folktales and through a number of written assignment and interactive games they add their own voice to the tale. Our final goal is an end of year Storytelling Festival for their families, friends and community members.

Last week I used a new worksheet I created with my fourth and fifth grade storytelling students to help their stories come alive. 




Below are some of the changes/additions the students made in their stories; they are capitalized and in bold font.


  • They walked down the path and found a SHALLOW stone well.
  • They QUICKLY tumbled down the shallow well.
  • Once there was a GRAND Chinese ruler who had a cat he treasured above all other animals.
  • The ruler gave a BROAD smile as he realized that his children were his wisest advisers of all. 
  • She FIRMLY held out her needle
  • “I see how fast you DEVOURED my mother’s butter.”
  • It told the boy about strange, VICIOUS stone giants and GHOSTLY flying heads
  • “I really should not say,” said the SNEAKY clam.
  • Beaver thought of a plan, a very BRILLIANT plan!
  • The oldest brother PROUDLY counted his bothers.
  • The youngest brother had a CREATIVE idea.
  • There once was a COLORFUL garden, filled with flowers STRETCHING toward the sun.
  • The girls SWIFTLY ran off.
  • They SLOWLY TIPTOED towards her.

I give you permission to use the worksheet in your storytelling work, however, I respectfully ask that you do not remove the copyright information and credit the source. Permission does not include using it in any other print material, i.e. books, workshop handouts, blogs, e-books, etc. Please feel free to contact me with any questions. 

If you would like the worksheet in a .doc file I will be happy to email it to you. You may reach me at storybug@aol.com If you do use it I would be delighted to know how it worked for your students. You will find additional handouts and games I created for my storytelling troupes in my award-winning book, Story by Story: Creating a Student Storytelling Troupe .

Please feel free to leave a comment and let me know what you think about this new worksheet. *Note: I monitor blog comments to avoid spam so you will not immediately see your note until I approve it. 



Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2017 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Monday, January 2, 2017

Stor e Telling: January February March 2016: Humor

The Golden Goose
Leslie Brooke, 1905
“Against the assault of laughter nothing can stand.”  - Mark Twain

The New Year is here and it is time to begin sharing my Storytelling Magazine columns from 2016. The magazine is a membership benefit of the National Storytelling Network. If you are interested in getting fabulous articles from world-renowned storytellers and educators, along with my most recent column, join us at www.storynet.org.  I will not be sharing any 2017 publications until 2018 rolls around.

Since the theme for this issue is humor I rounded up some noodleheads and simpletons to add to the fun!

STORIES

The Book of Noodles: Stories of Simpletons; or, Fools and Their Follies by W.A. Clouston, 1888.  A wide variety of noodlehead stories are found within; tales from Greece, Turkey, China, Japan, Kashmir…enough tales to keep you laughing and scratching your head for days!
http://tinyurl.com/pzelzst

Capturing the Moon - Poland
http://tinyurl.com/nugbajc

Fool of the King - Africa

The Golden Goose - Germany

Jack Tales and Folklore - United States 
Sixteen stories of our favorite fool, Jack.
http://tinyurl.com/q76p8mr

Kookaburras Laughter - Australia

Candlemas is February 2; I offer you some bright tales to light the way.

The Bearded Fool - India
http://tinyurl.com/pa6qlgh

The Candles of Life - Czechoslovakia

Christmas Eve Light - Europe
http://tinyurl.com/pdahbyc

The Flame of a Candle - Turkey
http://tinyurl.com/onyk3xz

Gaffer Death – Germany

The Hand of Glory - England
http://tinyurl.com/qhogv8v

The Red Candles and the Mermaid - Japan    
http://tinyurl.com/ofpauf2

The Rose Tree – England
http://tinyurl.com/qdpwh53

The Three Princes and the Maiden - Portugal
http://tinyurl.com/nb34ggg

The Twist Mouth Family - United States
http://tinyurl.com/p42zjqr


March 1 is National Pig Day, below are some tales to celebrate these clever, intelligent animals.

The Dog and the Pig - India

The Pig That Went to Church - United States

The Old Woman and Her Pig - England
http://tinyurl.com/8yagce3

The Three Green Men of Glen Nevis - Scotland


A few Irish tales to celebrate St. Patricks Day.

Irish Myths and Legends - Stories from the Ulster and Fennian Cycle, The Tuatha Dé Danaan, and later traditions. My thanks to Simon Brooks for passing this site along.
http://tinyurl.com/qzmwgpe

Something Extra

Read Write Think - Fractured fairy tales; classroom resources and more. “Whether it's The Princess and the Rutabaga or Big Blue Riding Hood, invite your students to turn familiar fairy tales upside down and inside out—and to have fun.”
http://tinyurl.com/ybohlo7

Writing Noodlehead StoriesA Unit for Second Through Sixth Grade 
From the amazing storytelling team of Hamilton and Weiss, a guide to help your students understand and craft their own Noodlehead tales.
http://tinyurl.com/ckbfmvf

Verve - While this is foremost an ecommerce business, scroll down for a list of 27 royalty free stock images for commercial use.

Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web links may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2017 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Monday, December 19, 2016

Stor e Telling: October November December 2015: Fairytales

The Princess Imprisioned in
the Summerhouse
by
H. J. Ford, 1892

This year is almost over and I just barely making it under the wire with the last 2015 Stor e Telling column from the National Storytelling Magazine. Next month, when we ring in 2017, I will begin sharing my columns from 2016. Until then, I hope you enjoy the stories below and find one, two, or maybe more to add to your storytelling repertoire.

If you would like to receive the freshest links as each new publication is published give yourself a holiday gift and become a member of the National Storytelling Network; the magazine is free with your membership.


“Fairy tales have positive uses in education...They convey knowledge of the world, shrewd lessons of virtue and vice, of common sense and sense of humour…they foster sympathy with nature…They cultivate the Imagination…” - Juliana Horatia Gatty Ewing



The theme of this issue was fairytales and I offered stories sprinkled with a bit of fairy tale magic.

The Book of Dragons by Edith Nesbit, 1899. Stop by and visit with the Ice Dragon, travel to the Island of the Nine Whirlpools, then continue on to meet other intriguing creatures.
http://tinyurl.com/pgs3r59

Hauff’s FairytalesEleven tales including Fatima’s Rescue, The Story of the False Prince and more.
http://tinyurl.com/ohrjl5w

Old Fashioned Fairy Tales by Juliana Horatia Gatty Ewing, 1841-1885. Eighteen tales including The Magician’s Gift, The Cobbler and the Ghost, and The Magic Jar.
http://tinyurl.com/oxm9xo2

November 13 is World Kindness Day. Below are a few folktales and additional resources.

The Ape, the Snake and the Lion - Africa
http://tinyurl.com/nky7avl

The Crystal Heart - Vietnam
http://tinyurl.com/qaxcooh

The Jester - Jewish
http://tinyurl.com/q3kvbca

Native Languages.org – Four Native American legends about kindness to animals.
http://tinyurl.com/oya5bp5  

The Princess Mouse - Finland
http://tinyurl.com/o2y4qss 

The Shield of Kindness - Ethiopia
http://tinyurl.com/nz2tkf6

Toads and Diamonds - France
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/lfb/bl/blfb28.htm

Wisdom Commons Seven stories of kindness from around the world.
http://tinyurl.com/p7ymwqw

Coffee Cups and Crayons -Acts of Kindness Books for Kids
http://tinyurl.com/peaa976

Four Scientifically Proven Ways to Teach Kindness – Lovely to note that the second way they specify is to ‘use folktales.’
http://tinyurl.com/pdxe4z7


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Fairy Tale of the Month – Since 2010 storyteller Charles Kiernan has been reflecting and discussing a wide variety of fairy tales. He encourages his readers to offer their thoughts and add to the discussion.
https://chaztales.wordpress.com/

Here’s to Fairy Tales and Happily Ever After!  A blog I wrote in January of 2015. The first half contains fun for the little ones, finger plays, etc., and the second half offers hundreds of public domain folktales to ensure that we live “Happily ever after!
http://tinyurl.com/njzdpfw

Simla Village or, Folk tales from the Himalayas - Twenty-four tales collected by Alice Elizabeth Dracott, published in 1906.
http://tinyurl.com/otuyysx

Autumn brings us fresh, crisp apples. Below are a few folktales to help you take a bite out of the season!

The Golden Bird -From the Brothers Grimm
http://tinyurl.com/7yg3oxn

The Laughing Apple and the Weeping Apple - Turkey
http://tinyurl.com/omkubrb

Martin Pippin in the Apple Orchard by Eleanor Farjeon. 1921
http://tinyurl.com/lf3xvb

The Silver Plate and the Transparent Apple - Russia
http://tinyurl.com/pcvr8aw

The Tale of the Three Apples - From the Arabian Nights
http://tinyurl.com/mjne76

It’s Harvest Time! Apple and Pumpkin Fun for the Wee Ones – Fingerplays, songs and more to make your lapsit program shine.
http://tinyurl.com/nrluwpj


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2016 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Sunday, September 18, 2016

Stor e Telling August September 2015: Workshops

The Pearl of the Elephant
by
Edmund Dulac, 1920

I have been remiss in continuing to share my Stor  e Telling articles from 2015. Since the conference proposal season is upon us it seems timely to post these resources from the August September 2015 issue of Storytelling Magazine.

The theme for this issue of Storytelling Magazine issue was workshops and I selected some articles, tutorials and icebreakers to help make your next workshop truly work!

If you have the time or the inclination, I would love it if you would leave a comment and let me know if this information is useful for your work. I read and respond to every comment and love hearing from you!


10 Steps To Plan a Workshop – Tips to help you design your workshop, craft an agenda, select a venue, and more.

A Workbook On Designing Successful Workshops – A forty-three page booklet with detailed instructions, including work pages, to plan and conduct a successful workshops.
http://www.mcgill.ca/medicinefacdev/files/medicinefacdev/DesigningWorkshopsWorkbook.pdf

Community Toolbox: Conducting a Workshop – Helpful steps and information organize and present your workshop. There are other sections that cover organizing conferences, retreats and teleconferences.

How To Run a Good Workshop – Very useful tips in a short article by bestselling author and speaker Scott Berkun.
http://scottberkun.com/2013/run-a-good-workshop/

Planning A Workshop: Organizing and Running a Successful Event
https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/PlanningAWorkshop.htm

Interested in using Skype to conduct your workshops? Below are three tutorials to help you quickly climb the learning ladder.

4 Things to Help Novice Users of Virtual Meeting Tools: Making Skype Meetings Run Smoothly

Skype Tutorial – Four separate, short tutorials that will help you learn how to use Skype from beginning to end.
And if you prefer a video tutorial, follow this link.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMAeAeyh7zM

Some sites offering icebreakers and activities to add conviviality to your workshops.

40 Icebreakers for Small Groups

100 Ways to Energize Groups: Games to Use in Workshops, Meetings and the Community
http://www.aidsalliance.org/assets/000/001/052/ene0502_Energiser_guide_eng_original.pdf?1413808298

Partners for Your Empowerment: Workshop Activities/Icebreakers – A twenty-three page booklet chockfull of exercises.
http://pyeglobal.org/workshop-activities-icebreakers/

September 22 is Elephant Appreciation Day. Here are some stories to celebrate these gentle giants.

And Elephants Did Fly - Southern Orissa, India

The Blind Man and the Elephant - India

The Elephant and the Dog – Bhutan

The Elephant and the Mahout – Magadha/Ancient India

Elephant and Tortoise – South Africa

Fearing the Wind - India

How the Elephant Got His Tusks - Africa

The Tortoise and the Elephant - Nigeria

The Tortoise Captures the Elephant - Africa

The Elephants Nose – India

Story-lovers.com – More elephant information than you can shake your trunk at!

Curriculum for the classroom to complement Elephant Appreciation Day.


The Elephant Sanctuary – Two units focusing on the study of elephants offering teaching and learning activities for children grades K-8 consisting of  72 pages of instruction, background information, charts and graphs, activities, etc.
http://www.elephants.com/curriculum.php

September 7 is Labor Day in the United States. In this blog post I offer you some multicultural folktales about workers around the world to add to your repertoire. You will also find crafts, curriculum resources, and some history of the holiday.

Labor Day: A Tribute to the American Worker

Something Extra

The link below was not part of the original Storytelling Magazine article. However, since then I have written a new blog, Putting Your Proposal Pieces Together; I think it will be a useful complement to the above resources.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2016/05/putting-your-proposal-pieces-together.html

Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2016 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Celebrating Ramadan


Public Prayer in the Mosqueby Jean-Léon Gerome
(French, Vesoul 1824–1904 Paris
)


Ramadan began on June 5, 2016 and continues to July 5, 2016. * The Islamic calendar is lunar and the days begin at sunset, so there may be one-day error depending on when the New Moon is first seen.

Ramadan is intended to teach Muslims about patience, spirituality, humility and submissiveness to God. Below are some stories to celebrate Ramadan.







STORIES


Patience

Helping Young Plants Grow - Taiwan
http://tinyurl.com/d978wpc


The Hidden
 One - Native American
http://tinyurl.com/c8ms28q


Patience-Stone and Patience-Knife – Turkey

http://tinyurl.com/c5yzxeo


The Tiger’s Whisker
 – Korea
https://www.storiestogrowby.org/story/tigers-whisker/


Humility


Forty Fortunes
 – Iran
http://tinyurl.com/bwbp9sm

The Magic Horse 
- Iran
https://www.storiestogrowby.org/story/magic-horse/

The Magic of Muskil
 Gusha - Iran
http://tinyurl.com/cw7lu8s

Poverty and Humility Lead to Heaven - Germany

http://tinyurl.com/6m4vj3l


Wisdom Commons.org
 - Eight tales of humility from around the world.
http://tinyurl.com/cyl8cnt


Spirituality 


The Singing Fir Tree - Switzerland
http://www.fairytalechannel.org/2008/03/singing-fir-tree.html


BOOKS

6 Favorite Children’s Books About Ramadan http://www.incultureparent.com/2013/07/6-favorite-childrens-books-about-ramadan/


C
URRICULUM

Celebrating Ramadan – A resource for K-12 educators.
http://muslimsinmichigan.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/0
4/celebratingramadan.pdf



History.com – Learn more about the history of Ramadan.
http://www.history.com/topics/holidays/ramadan


CRAFTS


DLTK-kids- Countries and Cultures Crafts for Kids: Islamic/Muslim
http://www.dltk-kids.com/world/muslim/





Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web links may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.



Karen Chace 2016 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.