Thursday, March 10, 2016

Step Up to the Story Plate! Interactive Storytelling Game


Personal photo: My son playing
baseball as a young child.
I believe that learning and play go hand in hand. The wonderful Fred Rogers said,

“Play is often talked about as if it were a relief from serious learning. But for children play is serious learning. Play is really the work of childhood."

I agree with his sentiment and add play to all of my storytelling residencies.
Each week, when I meet with my student storytelling troupe, I add an interactive game that is fun and also reinforces their storytelling skills. Over the years I have created a number of original games but I am always trying to come up with a new idea, and sometimes inspiration strikes in the strangest places!

Last week I was in the Dollar Store, picking up craft items for my Mass Humanities program when I spotted a set of baseball bases and began to think, “How I could use them as an interactive storytelling game?”  On the next aisle I noticed some white felt Easter baskets with a baseball design; this was too much of a coincidence! I bought the bases and buckets.

Over the weekend I brainstormed a bit and came up with the following interactive relay game, Step Up to the Story Plate, which my fourth and fifth grade students played for the first time this week. The game was a great success! The students were wildly cheering each other on; we had time to play it twice and they asked to play it again next week. It is a great game for helping them think on their feet, while reinforcing their story skills and comradery. While the set up and rules below may sound complicated, I assure you it is an easy game to set up and play.

I offer it here for you to use in your personal storytelling work. It is not to be published in any form without permission although you may share the blog link with your colleagues. I ask that you respect copyright and offer attribution whenever you use it. Batter up!

STEP UP TO THE STORY PLATE! © 2016
SUPPLIES




  • This is a relay game so you need two sets of plastic baseball bases. If you can’t find them to purchase, make your own out of cardboard.
  • Eight buckets to hold the questions at each base, three for each game, and two buckets to hold the dice at Home plate. I found the buckets above at the Dollar Store but you could use anything at your disposal.
  • A set of large, foam dice, found at the Dollar Store.
  • Green Card Stock to print out the questions. (Of course I used green, for the Green Monster in Fenway Park, home of the Boston Red Sox, but you can choose a different color.)

QUESTIONS

I came up with these questions but you can design your own. Nine questions for the nine innings in baseball, three extra questions just for fun. 

1.      Speak one line of dialogue from your story, using EMOTION!
2.      Share two gestures from your story. EXAGGERATE them!
3.      Describe the main setting of your story in three words.
4.      Describe a character in FOUR words.
5.      Tell your story in FIVE words.
6.      Show TWO FACIAL expressions from your story.
7.      Speak the FIRST sentence of your story.
8.      Introduce yourself and your story title WITH CONFIDENCE!
9.      Speak the LAST sentence of your story and take a bow!
10.  Steal one base.
11.  Steal two bases.
12.  Do the wave three times. 

SET UP

You will need a large space to lay out both sets of bases. Of course you don’t need to set them up the same distance as a regular baseball diamond but there should be enough room teams aren’t bumping into each other.

  • Arrange the two sets of baseball bases side by side. Make sure there is enough room for the students to run and move.
  • Place one bucket at each home plate with one die in each bucket.
  • Place questions in buckets at bases 1, 2, and 3. Make sure each set of buckets has the same questions and number of questions. For example, you have twelve questions, which equals four questions in each of their base buckets. Each bucket should have the same questions to make if fair for each relay team. For example, both first base buckets might have the following questions:

    1. Speak one line of dialogue from your story, using EMOTION!
    2. Share two gestures from your story. EXAGGERATE them!
    3. Describe the main setting of your story in three words.
    4. Describe a character in FOUR words.

§ 
RULES/DIRECTIONS

Go over the questions and rules with your students before they begin the game. If you have an assistant in your class, they can “coach” one relay team, while you help the other if they need assistance. When each student rolls the dice you need to be there to remind them what to do if they roll a #5 or #6. The others are self explanatory. The first team to finish wins the game!


This is a basic relay game, form two lines with the same amount of students. The first student in each line picks their foam dice out of the bucket at home plate, rolls the dice and moves through the game according to the number they rolled.


DICE NUMBERS SIGNIFY:
  • Number 1 – First Base
  • Number 2 – Second Base
  • Number 3 – Third Base
  • Number 4 – Homerun!
  • Number 5 – Pinch Hitter
  • Number 6 – Pinch Runner

TASKS RELATED TO EACH NUMBER

  • Student rolls #1: Runs to first base, picks a question from the bucket and perform task. Runs to second base, picks a question from the bucket and performs the task, and so on until they reach home plate, tags next player.
  • Student rolls #2:  Runs to second base, picks question from the bucket, performs task. Runs to third base, picks another question, performs task, runs to home plate, tags next player.
  • Student rolls #3 :  Runs to third base,  picks a question from the bucket, performs the task, runs to home plate, tags next player.
  • Student rolls #4: Student runs all of the bases without stopping to home plate.
  • Student rolls #5: Pinch Hitter: Student goes to the back of the line and the next student moves up. This is a disadvantage for the relay team as it adds another turn to their relay team.
  • Student rolls #6: Pinch Runner: Student steps aside, the next student in line steps up and runs to second base. This is an advantage to the team as the first student who rolled #6 is automatically finished with their turn. This relay team is one person ahead.


If you are interested in more original, interactive games, as well as story worksheets, please consider my award-winning book, Story by Story: Creating a Student Storytelling Troupe. I am also offering a brand new workshop, Story Play, at the LANES Sharing the Fire Conference on Saturday, April 2, 2016. You will learn additional activities not found in my book, to help both you and your students. For all of the conference information go to www.lanes.org .






Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web links may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.


Karen Chace 2016 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.


Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Celebrate National Pig Day: Stories, Songs, and More!


Pig and Pepper
from Alice's Wonderland Adventures
Illustration by Andrew Rackham, 1922

March 1 is National Pig Day; a day devoted to celebrating their place as one of man’s most intellectual and domesticated animals. Below you will find stories, songs, fingerplays, crafts and book suggestions to make the  most of this day!
STORIES


The Dog and the Pig - Indiahttp://tinyurl.com/oa5r8hu

The Enchanted Pig – Andrew Lang
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/lfb/re/refb11.htm
The Pig That Went to Church - United Stateshttp://tinyurl.com/oo9bznc

The Old Woman and Her Pig - England
http://tinyurl.com/8yagce3

The Sheep and the Pig Who Set Up House - Norway
http://oaks.nvg.org/ntales47.html
The Story of the Three Little Pigs - England
http://www.authorama.com/english-fairy-tales-16.html


The Three Green Men of Glen Nevis - Scotland
http://tinyurl.com/osz569v

FINGERPLAYS
Two Mother Pigs
Two mother pigs lived in a pen (show thumbs)
Each had four babies, and that made ten (show fingers and thumbs)
These four babies were soft and pink (hold up one hand, four fingers up)
These four babies were black as ink (hold up other hand, four fingers up)
All eight babies loved to play
And they rolled, and they rolled, in the mud all day. (roll hands over each other)
At night, with their mothers, they curled up in a heap, (make fists)
And squealed and squealed until they went...to...sleep. (turn fists over, palms up)
Five Little Pigs
Five little pigs rolled in the mud, (hold up five fingers then roll hands over each other)
Squishy, squashy, felt so good. (squish hands together left and right)
The farmer took one pig out. (pretend to take one out)
Oink, Oink, Oink, the pig did shout.  (Repeat with4,3,2,1)

No little pigs rolled in the mud, (shake head and index finger “no.”)
They all looked clean and good. (look at self and smile)
The farmer turned his back and then, (look behind)
Those pigs rolled in the mud again! (roll hands over each other)


SONGS/STORY STRETCH
Barnyard Song (Tune: If you're happy and you know it)

If you're a pig and you know it say oink, oinkIf you’re a pig and you know it say oink, oinkIf you’re a pig and you know it and you really want to show itIf you’re a pig and you know it say oink, oink 

If you’re a cow and you know it say moo, moo…If you’re a cat and you know it climb a tree…If you’re a horse and you know it gallop around…If you’re a dog and you know bark out loud…If you’re a bird and you know it flap your wings…If you’re a pig and you know roll in the mud…

Three Pigs Rap
This is the story about three pigs
Who needed to go out and get new digs.
Each set out on his own way
To build himself a place to stay
“I'm a lazy pig. I need time to play.
I am building a house of hay!”
Now that didn't work out for too long
Soon he heard the wolf sing his song
“I'll huff and I'll puff” (He'll huff and he'll puff)
“I'll huff and I'll puff and I'll blow your house down!”
Then the pig heard this real loud sound.
He blew the house down
Off he went, off he ran
To see if his brother had a better plan
“When I saw my brother and heard him cry,
I said, Let's give a house of wood a try‟
They built the house; they built it strong,
But soon the wolf came along
“I'll huff and I'll puff” (He'll huff and he‟ll puff)
“I'll huff and I'll puff and I'll blow your house down”
Then the pigs heard this real loud sound.
He blew the house down.
Off they went, Off they ran
To see if their sister had a better plan.
“Now come my brothers, you look so sick.
Come and stay in my house of brick
The wolf can blow, but it will do no good.
You can't blow stone like hay or wood.”
The wolf came. He gave a huff and puff.
Soon he learned that it wasn't enough
It's best he learned to leave others alone
When they are safely in their homes!
http://freesongsforkids.com/audios/three-pigs-rap

Three Pigs In A Bed
There were three pigs in a bed,

And the little one said,
"Roll over, roll over".
So they all rolled over and one fell out!

Repeat with two pigs

One pig in the bed,
And you know what he said?
I've got the whole mattress to myself!


To Market, To Market
To Market, to market to buy a fat pigHome again, home again jiggity jig.To market, to market to buy a fat hogHome again, home again, jiggity jog.
BOOKS
Children’s Books About Pigs: Funny Bedtime Stories
http://hubpages.com/family/The-10-Best-Childrens-Books-About-Pigs-Funny-Bedtime-Stories


CRAFTS
Dltk- kids – Lots of fun pig crafts here that will have you squealing in no time at all.http://www.dltk-kids.com/animals/pigs.htm


SOMETHING EXTRA
Literacy Tip: Pack a book. Tuck a storybook or two in the diaper bag and in the car for the older infant, toddler, and preschooler. The habit of filling in life's spaces with books and always having books handy helps a child see them as a regular part of life. 
http://www.pampers.com/Ready-to-Read:-Literacy-Tips-for-Toddlers--and-Preschoolers                                                                          



Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.



Karen Chace 2016 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Bilingual Storytelling: Stor e Telling June July 2015


Uncle Henry and Aunt Em
From the Emerald City of Oz
Illustration by John R. Neill, 1900
I am continuing to share my Stor e Telling columns from the National Storytelling Magazine. The resources below are from the June July 2015 issue. All of the links have been checked and updated where necessary.

Please note that I only add my columns to my blog when the year has passed. To receive additional, timely resources, please consider becoming a member of the National Storytelling Network. Your membership includes the National Storytelling Magazine.

This issue on bilingual storytelling; I begin with some sites to complement the theme.

Bilingual Storytimes: Utah Department of Heritage and Arts - The following resources were from Bilingual Storytime for Gringos at the 2009 Utah Library Association Conference.
https://heritage.utah.gov/library/spanish-bilingual-storytimes

Bilingual Books for Kids - This site offers book suggestions on a variety of themes: fairytales, myths, legends, fables, nursery rhymes, songs and more.  Activities and coloring pages are also included.
http://www.bilingualbooks.com/cgi-bin/category.cgi?category=0


Colorin Colorado
- An array of terrific resources for teaching English Language Learners. This is the link to the main page http://www.colorincolorado.org/. This link takes you to reading tip sheets in 12 languages for parents who want to establish a love of reading with their children.
http://www.colorincolorado.org/reading-tip-sheets-parents


Colorado Libraries for Early Literacy: Story Blocks
– Videos of songs and rhymes in English, Spanish and Vietnamese from infant to preschool.http://www.storyblocks.org/videos/

Idaho Commission for Libraries: Bilingual Storytime Ideas
- Read aloud books, fingerplays, songs and rhymes to make your bilingual story time shine.
http://libraries.idaho.gov/files/Storytime-Bilingual.pdf


Texas State Libraries and Archives Commission
– A lovely selection of songs, fingerplays, books, and more for preschool programs, in English and Spanish.
https://www.tsl.texas.gov/ld/pubs/bilingual/preschoolers/index.html

Little Bilingues
Downloadable books of activities in English and French.
http://www.littlebilingues.com/free_materials.html

BILINGUAL STORIES AND LESSON PLANS

Culture in the Classroom and the Language of Folklore – Short article on why folktales work for ELL students, along with some sample activities with stories to use.
http://newsmanager.commpartners.com/tesolc/issues/2013-10-01/2.html

Everything ESL
“Forty-Two content based lesson plans for beginning to intermediate students.”
http://www.everythingesl.net/lessons/

Magic Tales of Mexico
– Nine Mexican folktales, collected by Gabriel A. Cordova, Jr.. The stories are shared in Spanish and English.
http://www.g-world.org/magictales/

Ten Folk-tales from the Cape Verde Islands
– The folktales are shared in both English and Portuguese.
https://archive.org/stream/jstor-534343/534343_djvu.txt

STORIES

July 26 is Aunt and Uncle Day in the United States. Here are a few stories to add to our repertoire.

Aunt Rachel’s Curse – United States
http://tinyurl.com/lenov6n

The Aunts - Portugal
http://tinyurl.com/mk8z39u

Bundar Bahadur Poon - Nepal
http://tinyurl.com/mvbjsgf

Chittapas (uncles) Or Cheats - India
http://tinyurl.com/k7x4249

The Icon’s Warm Bread - Greece
http://tinyurl.com/mqsv3jd

The Lazy Beauty and Her Aunts – Ireland
http://tinyurl.com/kvy7t7f

The Strange Creature – Zimbabwe
http://tinyurl.com/oy6sz8p

Uncle Bouki and Ti Malice - Haiti
http://tinyurl.com/mcsvgv2

The Wolf Aunt - Persia
http://tinyurl.com/pdjtm6s

ADDITIONAL STORY SITES

A Collection of WisdomMulla, Sufi, Indian, Buddhist folktales and more. These stories are short in length but long in wisdom. They would be especially useful in a beginning storytelling workshop if you need some tales to help your student’s succeed.
http://www.rodneyohebsion.com/folktales.htm 


Ethiopian English Readers
– Eighty-eight stories from the different regions of Ethiopia. My thanks to storyteller Donna Dudinsky for sharing this site.
http://www.ethiopianenglishreaders.com/

Stories4U
– A site filled with story; Mythology, the Panchatantra, Folktales, Legends and more.
http://stories4u.50webs.com/vik_intro.html


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2016 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Friday, February 5, 2016

Family Fun! Fingerplays, Songs, Crafts and More


Le Dejeuner sur l’herbe de la Famille Soler
by Pablo Picasso, 1903
The snow if falling here in Massachusetts and many schools were cancelled today. Families may be snowed in a bit this weekend so here are a few fun things to do together.

FINGERPLAYS

There Are Five Families

There are five families in the bed (hold up five fingers)And the little one said, “Roll Over! Roll Over!” (roll hands over each together)So they all rolled out.And one fell out. (one hand rolls to one side) Repeat with four, three, two, and oneThere were no families in the bed (hold up fist)And the little one said,“Good night!” (lay head on hands and close eyes)

Grandma’s Glasses
These are Grandma’s glasses, (fingers make glasses around eyes)And this is Grandma’s hat, (hands make hat on head)And this is the way she folds her hands,(fold hands)

And lays them in her lap. (hands on lap)These are Grandpa’s glasses, (make huge glasses with hands)

And this is Grandpa’s hat, (huge hat above head)And this is the way he folds his arms, (large gestures to fold arms)

And lays them on his lap.(lay folded arms down) 

Going to Bed

This little child is going to bed. (point to self)
Down on the pillow he lays his head. (rest head on hands)
He wraps himself in covers tight. (wrap arms around body)
And this is the way he sleeps all night. (close eyes, rest head on hands)
Morning comes, he opens his eyes (raise head, eyes wide open)
Off with a toss the covers fly. (fling arms wide)
Soon he is up, dressed, and away.
He’s ready to play all day. (clap hands)


STORY STRETCH

Families, Families Families Everywhere

Families, families families everywhere! (point in different directions)
Families, families climbing stairs. (make climbing motion)
Families, families giving stares (hands to eyes as if looking through glasses)
Families washing hairs. (hair washing motions)
Families, families everywhere!
Families up! (up on tip toe)
Families down! (bend knees and stoop down)
Families, families all around! (turn around once slowly)
Families, families sit back down!

The Family On Parade

Clap your hands (clap hands)
Stamp your feet (stamp feet)
The family is coming done the street. (march in place)
Rum, pum pum (motion beating a drum) A great big drum.
Root-a-toot-toot (hands to mouth blowing a horn)
Bang! Bang! Bang! (Clap hands together)
Clap your hands! (Clap hands)
Stamp your feet! (Stamp feet)
The family is coming down the street!

SONG

We’re On Our Way to Grandpa’s Farm

Chorus

We're on our way, we're on our way.
On our way to Grandpa's farm.
We're on our way, we're on our way.
On our way to Grandpa's farm.

Down on Grandpa's farm there is a big brown cow…x2
The cow, she makes a sound like this: "Mooooooo”…x2

Chorus

Down on Grandpa's farm there is a little yellow duck…x2
The duck, she makes a sound like this: "Quack Quack."…x2

Chorus

Down on Grandpa's farm there is a little pink pig… x2
The pig she makes a sound like this: "Oink, Oink”…x2

Chorus

Down on Grandpa's farm there is a black and white skunk...x2
The skunk, he often smells like this “pee ewww”…x2


BOOKS




CRAFTS



DIY Fun Ideas – Family Hand Prints http://diyfunideas.com/diy-family-hand-prints/






Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.



Karen Chace 2016 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.


Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Elephants: Gentle Giants Among Us II


From The Folk-Tales of Bengal, 1911
Illustration by Warwick Goble

“Nature’s great masterpiece, an elephant; the only harmless great thing.” – John Dunne

Below are some of the fingerplays, songs and story stretchers I use during a storytelling lapsit program for toddlers. Some of these are found on the web with no attribution. Wherever I could find an author, I have noted the link and attribution. Have fun with the elephants!

FINGERPLAYS


One Little Elephant

One elephant went out to play, (hold up one finger)
Over the hills and far away. (wave finger like it is going over the hills)
She had such enormous fun, (on “enormous” circle arms out and around)
That she called for another elephant to come. (cup hands over mouth)
“Oh Elephant!”… (call out and then pound the floor for the running elephant sound)
Two elephants went out to play, (use two fingers…repeat above actions)
Over the hills and far away.
They had such enormous fun they called for another elephant to come.
“Oh Elephant!”…
(Repeat with as many elephants (fingers) as you want)
http://www.nncc.org/curriculum/fingerplay.html


Five Gray Elephants

Five gray elephants, marching through the glade,
Decide to stop and play like they are having a parade.
The first sings his trunk and announces he’ll lead;
The next waves a flag which of course they need.
The third gray elephant trumpets a song;
The fourth beats a drum as he marches along.
While the fifth makes believe he’s the whole show
And nods and smiles to the crowd as they go.
Five gray elephants, marching through the glade,
Having a lot of fun during their parade.
http://www.childfun.com/themes/animals/elephants/

SONGS AND STORY STRETCH

Elephants At Work and Play

As five little elephants marched through the grass (march fingers of right hand)
They decided to stop and have a music class,
The first blew his trumpet and announced he'd be teacher. (make a trumpet of fists and blow)
The next gave a call of the wild jungle animal (cup hands to mouth, make a low eerie sound)
The third & fourth elephants trumpeted a song, (make a trumpet and blow twice )
But the last little elephant just followed along,
Then he left the others as he didn't care to play,
And he carried tree logs the rest of the day. (link the little finger under two fingers of the left hand and carry them away)

Zoo Animals  
(To the tune of If You’re Happy and You Know It)

If you want to be an elephant swing your trunk
If you want to be an elephant swing your trunk
If you want to be an elephant, if you want to be an elephant
If you want to be an elephant swing your trunk

Monkey, jump up high!
Parrot — flap your wings
Elephant — swing your trunk
Lion — roar out loud
Giraffe — stand up tall

An Elephant Goes
An elephant goes like this and that, (wave arms in front like trunk)
He’s oh so big, (raise arms up)
And he’s oh so fat. (spread arms out to the sides)
He has no fingers, (wiggle fingers)
He has no toes, (shake feet)
BUT, goodness gracious, WHAT A NOSE!

The Elephants Are Here! (To the tune of "The Farmer in the Dell")

The elephants are here! (Look excited)
The elephants are here!
Look at all the elephants! (Shade eyes as if looking)
The elephants are here!

They're exercising now. (March in place, keeping feet on floor, pumping arms)
They're exercising now.
Look at all the elephants!
They're exercising now.

They're jumping up and down! They're jumping up and down!
Look at all the elephants! They're jumping up and down!

They're touching all their toes…
They're spinning 'round and 'round…
They're all exhausted now...
They're all exhausted now...
Look at all the elephants...
They're all exhausted now...
ZZZZZZZ (Lots of snoring)
http://www.childfun.com/index.php/activity-themes/animals/115-elephant-activity-theme.html?start=2 

BOOKS

Children’s Books GuideA wonderful list of books about our excellent elephant friends.
http://childrensbooksguide.com/elephants

CRAFT



Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2016 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.