Thursday, February 16, 2017

Play with a Purpose: Story Play

Ring Around the Rosie
by Edward Henry Potthast,1910-1915
Below is an article I wrote last year for the Northeast Storytelling organization. I was honored to present a new workshop, Story Play, at their 2016 Conference in Amherst, MA. 

This year, I am equally honored to bring this workshop, based on my award winning book, Story by Story: Creating a Student Storytelling Troupe, to the 
National Storytelling Conference in Kansas City, MO. The theme is "All Our Voices: Stories of Immigration and Migration" and there will be workshops and intensives on storytelling, business, education, cultural heritage and so much more.
For information go to http://www.storynet.org/conference/ . Workshop descriptions will be added very soon so be sure to bookmark the site.

“Play is often talked about as if it were a relief from serious learning. But for children play is serious learning. Play is really the work of childhood.”                                                                                                  Fred Rogers                                          
Play with a Purpose!
From the moment my students stepped into the room for the after school storytelling program, ‘after school’ being the operative words, I was already at a disadvantage. By then they had been sitting at their desks for almost five hours, with only 20 minutes for recess, barely any time at all to add movement and play to their day. How could I keep them motivated through 13 weeks of class, especially for those students who return year after year?
  I quickly learned that play and movement were two key ingredients.

While I began to create different worksheets to help them sequence and visualize their folktales, I knew it was equally important to get them on their feet, let their bodies feel the stories. Sometimes it was a combination of both. One of my newest creations, Exaggeration Station, was a perfect marriage of the two. The objective is to encourage them to play with the elements of their story.

I prepared a worksheet for the students to complete before the game, which mirrored the nine poster boards placed around the room; this gave them a chance to think through their choices. Since we were in the school library I used the book stands for the poster boards, placing them on the shelves, no higher than eye level. They were organized in a pattern that wove them up and down the aisles so the children could easily move through the game. We immediately followed up with Walk the Talk, another movement activity, and they quickly incorporated what they discovered while playing Exaggeration Station.

More than once I've reconfigured a childhood game into a new classroom activity. Sometimes inspiration comes in an instant in the most unexpected places. One day I was working with my third grade storytelling troupe. We were using the school hallway for a version of The Virginia Reel. Rather than standing still and facing each other, they were paired up, walking side by side, one teller sharing their tale with their partner. As they were executing the activity I suddenly noticed two girls reach out to hold hands. Immediately, the memory of an old schoolyard game popped into my head and a brand new activity, Red Rover, Red Rover Send Story Right Over, was born.

Another day we began by completing the written exercise, Language Ladders. Immediately after finishing their worksheets I cued up the music and we began to “Dialogue and Dance!” By merging the tactile exercise of writing, then quickly moving to an interactive game utilizing their new story dialogue, it reinforced and stimulated their work.

After fifteen years of teaching I still continue to think about new ways to bring movement into the classroom. It’s no surprise we all love to play so why not incorporate as much as possible into our day and play with a purpose!
  
Want to add some more play to your classroom, to your storytelling? Whether you are a beginning or experienced storyteller, you will find something to add to your story toolbox. Register for my workshop, Story Play, at the National Storytelling Conference this summer and I promise we will have fun...and chocolates!












2016 Recipient Storytelling World Honor Award
2011 Recipient Anne Izard Storytellers' Choice Award
Available at www.amazon.com or http://www.parkhurstbrothers.com/ 


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2017 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.


Sunday, February 12, 2017

Stor e Telling June July 2016: Reprise

The Storyteller
by
Der Erzahler, 1805
This is the third Stor e Telling installment from 2016. This issue was a reprise of the ‘best of the best’ offered through the years. I did the same with my column and culled through my extensive archives, dating back to 2002, bringing you a reprise of some of my favorite storytelling websites.


4 to 40
Folktales and stories from around the world, including Jakarta, Estonia, Ukraine, and more.
http://tinyurl.com/2965eu 

Absolutely Whootie: Stories to Grow By
Multicultural folktales searchable by continent and country, and play scripts as well. It also offers stories categorized by themes to foster positive behavior and reinforcement.

The Baldwin Project
A comprehensive collection of literature in the public domain; read tales from as far back as 1880.
http://tinyurl.com/jpcpx6m

Chinese Legends, Or, The Porcelain Tower
There are many wonderful myths, folktales and legends from China is this 1848 book by Thomas Henry Sealy, now in the public domain.

Fairy Tales from Brazil: How and Why Tales from Brazilian Folk-lore
Enjoy eighteen pourquoi tales collected by Elsie Spicer Eells from1917.
http://tinyurl.com/k42zduv

The Golden Rod Fairy Book
Published in 1903; stories from England, France, Poland, Bohemia, Russia, India, China, Italy, Denmark, Ireland and Spain are contained within.

Learning to Give
Lesson plans, complimentary folktales, and parent resources to involve students in philanthropy and serving their communities.

Mysterious Britain
Banshees, selkies, giants and dragons are but a few of the folktales and legends from England, Wales and Scotland.
http://tinyurl.com/ld7gro

Myths, Folktales and Fairytales
Explore folklore with Nina Jaffe, experience a storytelling workshop with Gerald Fierst or a myth writing workshop with Jane Yolen. There are teacher guides, assessments, rubrics, and stories.
http://tinyurl.com/2z2ogy

Orkneyjar - The Heritage of the Orkney Islands
Tradition, folklore and more; enjoy the beauty and history of the Orkney Islands.

Sacred Text Archives                    
Explore the world through this amazing collection of texts on religion, mythology, legends, folklore, and more.                                                        

Scottish Fairy and Folk TalesA lovely collection of Scottish fairy and folk tales from 1901.

Speak Bird, Speak Again
A book of Palestinian Arab Folktales from Ibrahim Muhawi and Sharif Kanaana.

Tales of Laughter
A collection tales from Ireland, Spain, France, Russia and other countries from around the globe. They are sure to have you smiling with delight!

Tales of the Punjab: Told by the People
A wonderful collection of Eastern Indian tales with notes to the stories.

Teaching with Folklore Index
An entry point for busy teachers who wish to use folklore with their class; the resources are aimed mainly at elementary grades one to six.

Women and the Sea
A valuable collection of resources outlining women’s experiences and contributions as sailors, lighthouse keepers, yachting, mermaid myths, and more. There is also an extensive bibliography.

If you missed the first 2016 installment you may access it here:

January February March 2016 – Humor
The theme for this issue was humor so you will find some noddlehead stories to make you smile. Also, there are tales to celebrate Candlemas, St. Patrick's Day, National Pig Day, and a few extra goodies.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/01/stor-e-telling-january-february-march.html 

April Mary 2016 – Storytelling World Awards
This is the second installment of my 2016 Stor e Telling column from Storytelling Magazine. The theme was Storytelling World Awards. You will find downloadable public domain books from around the world, stories to celebrate Red Rose Day and Mother's Day, and a few other resources, including links to all of the other columns, dating back to 2007. Have fun surfing!

If you are interested in the previous Stor e Telling columns you will find them all at the links below. Each section has a short synopsis to make it easier for you to find what interests you.

From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources III: Stor e Tellng 2015
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/01/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html 

 

From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources II: Stor e Telling 2014


From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources: Stor e Telling 2013
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/06/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html

Stor e Telling Columns: 2007 to 2012 with Synopses
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/stor-e-telling-columns-2007-to-2012.html

In addition, all of my Stor e Telling columns in Storytelling Magazine from 2002-2006 are listed on the Publication’s Page on my website. One caveat, I have not had the opportunity to recheck all of the links; that is a project for another day. You will find a point and click extravaganza of story research here:
http://storybug.net/stor-e-telling.html


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2017 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.


Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Stor e Telling: April May 2016: Storytelling World Awards

The Soul of the Rose
by
John  William Waterhouse, 1908
The second Stor e Telling addition from 2016. Below is the April/May issue. The theme for this issue is Storytelling World Awards so let’s take a spin around the globe with these books, which are now happily in the public domain.

Folk-lore and Legends of Germany by Anonymous, 1892. Water-sprites, dancers, elves and more are found between the virtual covers of this book.
http://tinyurl.com/zrgykdm 

Korean Folk Tales: Imps, Ghosts and Fairies by James S. Gale, 1913. Visit with Ten Thousand Devils, The Awful Little Goblin, and more mysterious creatures from Korea. http://tinyurl.com/jyk8xdo

The Norwegian Fairy Book by Clara Stroebe, 1922. Meet The Troll-Wife, The Young Fellow and the Devil, or The Pastor and the Sexton, and then make your way through the other 34 stories from Norway.

Tales Of The Fairies And Of The Ghost World by Jeremiah Curtin, 1895. Fitzgerald, O’Donohue, Kerry and Connors are just a few of the men and their stories included in the volume of 30 Irish tales.
http://tinyurl.com/hr2fedt 

The Talking Thrush and Other Tales of India collected by W. Crooke and retold by W.H. Drouse, 1922. The jackal, tortoise, goat, and monkey are just a few of the animals you will meet in these 43 tales from India.
http://tinyurl.com/jkakm5l 

Told in the Coffee House: Turkish Tales collected by Cyrus Adler and Allan Ramsay, 1898. According to the author, “Some of the stories…are adaptations of those already known in Arabic and Persian literature, but the Turkish mind gives them a new setting and a peculiar philosophy.” http://tinyurl.com/hjkxxn6 

Viking Tales by Jennie Hall, 1902. “These Norse stories have… three values…the love of truth, the hardy endurance, the faithfulness to plighted word, that make them a child's fit companions.”
http://tinyurl.com/hzzh2dx 

May 8 is Mother’s Day in the USA. Below is a blog post I wrote in 2013 with stories, crafts and more. All of the links have been checked; ready, set, surf!

Mother’s Day and Memories

June 12 is Red Rose Day; let’s stop and smell the roses!

The Blue Rose – China

The Daughter of the Rose – Romania

The Elf of the Rose – Hans Christian Andersen

Legend of the Cherokee Rose – Native American

The Legend of the Christmas Rose - Italy

Little Wild-Rose – Romania

The Maiden with the Rose on Her Forehead - Portugal

The Nightingale and the Rose – Oscar Wilde

The Rose - Grimm

The Rose Beauty – Turkey

The Rose Tree – England

The Snail and the Rose Tree – Hans Christian Andersen

The Three Roses – Czechoslovakia 

SOMETHING EXTRA

Bodleian Libraries University of Oxford – Adult coloring books are all the rage right now. Download these gorgeous book illustrations from 1599 to color. Thanks to Carol McCormick for sharing this gem.
http://tinyurl.com/hqsdxo9 

If you missed the first 2016 installment you may access it here:

January February March 2016 - Humor
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/01/stor-e-telling-january-february-march.html 

If you are interested in the previous Stor e Telling columns you will find them all at the links below:

From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources III: Stor e Tellng 2015
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/01/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html 


From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources II: Stor e Telling 2014


From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources: Stor e Telling 2013
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/06/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html

Stor e Telling Columns: 2007 to 2012 with Synopses
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/stor-e-telling-columns-2007-to-2012.html

In addition, all of my Stor e Telling columns in Storytelling Magazine from 2002-2006 are listed on the Publication’s Page on my website. One caveat, I have not had the opportunity to recheck all of the links; that is a project for another day. You will find a point and click extravaganza of story research here: http://storybug.net/stor-e-telling.html
Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2017 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Monday, January 23, 2017

Chinese New Year 2017: The Year of the Fire Rooster

From Grimm's Fairy Tales
by
Arthur Rackham, 1909
On January 28 the Chinese New Year begins and 2017 is The Year of the Rooster. In Chinese element theory, each zodiac year is associated with one of five elements: Gold (Metal), Wood, Water, Fire, or Earth, which means that a Fire Rooster, for example, comes once every 60-year cycle. This is the year of the Fire Rooster.

  • People born in a year of the Rooster are very observant. hardworking, resourceful, courageous, and talented.
  • Roosters are very confident in themselves.
  • Roosters are always active, amusing, and popular within a crowd.
  • Roosters are happiest when they are surrounded by others, whether at a party or just a social gathering.
  • Roosters are healthy and enjoy sports
  • People born in a year of the Rooster are typically healthy people. They are active and enjoy sports, such as hiking and swimming.


Below are some tales to add to the celebration.

The Brave Rooster - Latvia

The Cat and the Rooster – Ukraine
http://tinyurl.com/zdscqm4

The Fighting Roosters and the Eagle – Aesop
http://tinyurl.com/owgvab4

The Frankfurt Rooster - Germany

Half Rooster – Albania
http://tinyurl.com/htks8xl

The Impudent Rooster - Romanian

The Polecat and the Rooster - Khmer

Reynard and Chanticleer - Norway

The Rooster - Ethiopia

The Rooster and the Pearl – Aesop
http://tinyurl.com/gvmvdy9

The Rooster’s Lament – China
http://tinyurl.com/j3cedn7

Storie of Cinderlaras - Indonesia

The Tale of the Golden Cockerel - Russia
http://tinyurl.com/glstjkm

The Weathercock on St. Stephen’s Cathedral - Austria

CRAFTS

Activity Village – Crafts, templates, coloring pages, puzzles, and worksheets.
https://www.activityvillage.co.uk/year-of-the-rooster

CURRICULUM


First-School
– Rooster themed activities, crafts and more for preschoolers.
http://www.first-school.ws/theme/animals/birds/rooster.htm

National Agriculture Literacy Curriculum Matrix
– From Chicken Little to Chicken Big for grades 3 – 5.
http://www.agclassroom.org/teacher/matrix/lessonplan.cfm?lpid=245

Read Write Think
– Chinese New Year: Multiple lesson plans for grades 6 -12 including additional web links to resources on the celebration.

GAMES

Activity Village – A variety of games to celebrate the Chinese New Year.
https://www.activityvillage.co.uk/chinese-new-year-games


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web links may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2017 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Thursday, January 12, 2017

From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources III: Stor e Telling 2015

Scheherazade and a Quest
by
Abu'l-Hasan Khan
Ghaffari Kashani (1814–1866)
The tale of the Persian beauty Scheherazade is one all storytellers are familiar with, a woman who saved her own life by sharing 1000 stories by the end of 1001 nights.

I began writing the Stor e Telling column for Storytelling Magazine in 2002 and since then I have reviewed well over 2001 storytelling and educational websites, as well as individual folktales, fairy tales, myths and legends.


Below are the columns I wrote in 2015, each with a synopsis to help you find what you may be seeking in case your time is limited.

At the end of the blog you will also find links to all of the columns from 2002 – 2014. At the time they were posted all of the links were active. If you find a dead link please let me know and I will do my best to find the updated source.

 

I hope you find something useful and fun to add to your storytelling repertoire or classroom, business enterprises or school curriculum. As always, I appreciate any comments you wish to share. Happy surfing! 


Stor e Telling  January February 2015: Drama
There are resources on theme of drama, folktales to celebrate the ‘roar’ of March, fairy to celebrate Tell a Fairy Tale Day and more.

Stor e Telling March April May 2015: National Storytelling Conference
Celebrate with stories! Victoria Day in Canada, Go Fishing Day in the USA, and resources to help you find your way to fun at the National Storytelling Conference in Missouri. (The conference is being held there again this year so the information will still be useful.)
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2016/01/stor-e-telling-march-april-may-2015.html

Stor e Telling June July 2015: Bilingual Storytelling
Bilingual stories and resources, including downloadable books, activities and lesson plans. Also, tales to celebrate Aunt and Uncle Day in the USA, and myths, legends, Sufi, Buddhist tales and many more.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2016/02/bilingual-storytelling-stor-e-telling.html

Stor e Telling August September 2015: Workshops
Planning to submit a workshop proposal in 2017? You will find a number of resources to help you get that coveted ‘You have been accepted” letter. Want to offer a virtual workshop? You will find Skype three tutorials also resources to guide you through learning curve. There are also links to icebreakers, always a great tool to use in workshops. There are also stories and curriculum to celebrate Elephant Appreciation Day!
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2016/09/stor-e-telling-august-september-2015.html

Stor e Telling October November December: Fairy Tales
Of course, since the theme for this issue was fairy tales you will find three public domain books filled with wonder. There are other tales to herald World Kindness Day, delicious stories about fall apples that pack a tasty crunch, and more!
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2016/12/stor-e-telling-october-november.html


If you are interested in the previous Stor e Telling columns I posted you will find them all at the links below:

From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources II: Stor e Telling 2014


From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources: Stor e Telling 2013
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/06/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html

Stor e Telling Columns: 2007 to 2012 with Synopses
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/stor-e-telling-columns-2007-to-2012.html

In addition, all of my Stor e Telling columns in Storytelling Magazine from 2002-2006 are listed on the Publication’s Page on my website. One caveat, I have not had the opportunity to recheck all of the links; that is a project for another day. You will find a point and click extravaganza of story research here: http://storybug.net/stor-e-telling.html



Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web links may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2017 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Adding Actions and Adjectives: Storytelling Worksheet

For the past 15 years I have been working with students, teaching them the art of Oral Tradition. They choose their own folktales and through a number of written assignment and interactive games they add their own voice to the tale. Our final goal is an end of year Storytelling Festival for their families, friends and community members.

Last week I used a new worksheet I created with my fourth and fifth grade storytelling students to help their stories come alive. 




Below are some of the changes/additions the students made in their stories; they are capitalized and in bold font.


  • They walked down the path and found a SHALLOW stone well.
  • They QUICKLY tumbled down the shallow well.
  • Once there was a GRAND Chinese ruler who had a cat he treasured above all other animals.
  • The ruler gave a BROAD smile as he realized that his children were his wisest advisers of all. 
  • She FIRMLY held out her needle
  • “I see how fast you DEVOURED my mother’s butter.”
  • It told the boy about strange, VICIOUS stone giants and GHOSTLY flying heads
  • “I really should not say,” said the SNEAKY clam.
  • Beaver thought of a plan, a very BRILLIANT plan!
  • The oldest brother PROUDLY counted his bothers.
  • The youngest brother had a CREATIVE idea.
  • There once was a COLORFUL garden, filled with flowers STRETCHING toward the sun.
  • The girls SWIFTLY ran off.
  • They SLOWLY TIPTOED towards her.

I give you permission to use the worksheet in your storytelling work, however, I respectfully ask that you do not remove the copyright information and credit the source. Permission does not include using it in any other print material, i.e. books, workshop handouts, blogs, e-books, etc. Please feel free to contact me with any questions. 

If you would like the worksheet in a .doc file I will be happy to email it to you. You may reach me at storybug@aol.com If you do use it I would be delighted to know how it worked for your students. You will find additional handouts and games I created for my storytelling troupes in my award-winning book, Story by Story: Creating a Student Storytelling Troupe .

Please feel free to leave a comment and let me know what you think about this new worksheet. *Note: I monitor blog comments to avoid spam so you will not immediately see your note until I approve it. 



Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2017 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.