Saturday, January 11, 2020

1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources VI: Stor e Telling 2018

The Storyteller
by
Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo
1773-1777
Below are the Stor e Telling columns I wrote in 2018 for the National Storytelling Magazine, each with a synopsis to help you find what you are seeking in case your time is limited. The magazine is a membership perk from the National Storytelling Network. The publication offers outstanding articles from well-known national and international storytellers, and educators from around the world on a wide variety of topics, and of course, stories. If you would like to become a member please visit https://storynet.org/membership/ .

At the end of the blog you will also find links to all of the columns from 2007 – 2017. At the time they were posted all of the links were active. If you find a dead link please let me know and I will do my best to find the updated source. I hope you find something fabulous and fun! As always, I appreciate any comments you wish to share.

Stor e Telling Fall 2018: Storytelling and Empathy
The theme for this issue was storytelling and empathy, both are greatly needed in our current climate. You will also find additional stories about the glorious pumpkins that dot the fall landscape, candle tales to celebrate the Feast of Saint Ambrose.

Stor e Telling Summer 2018: Storytelling Traditions Around the World
Many of us are familiar with The Moth and StoryCorp but what about some of the other ancient forms of storytelling? In this blog post you will read about a few of the fascinating and different traditions from around the world to complement the issue's theme. You will also find stories to celebrate Be An Angel Day on August 22 so get ready to fly with these new tales.

Stor e Telling Spring 2018: Storytelling World 
Unwrap some fun and fabulous resources to love and add to your repertoire. The theme was Storytelling World so you will find tales from many cultures. There are also legends to savor on Tea for Two Tuesday on March 21, Noodlehead tales to tickle your funny bone for International Moment of Laughter Day on April 14, and folktales for Bat Appreciation Day on April 17.

SOMETHING EXTRA

This link will take you to a previous blog post with all of my Stor e Telling columns from 2007-2017.

1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources V: Stor e Telling 2017


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.


This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.
Karen Chace 2020 ©
  

Thursday, January 9, 2020

Stor e Telling: Storytelling World Spring 2019

  
The New Year is upon us so it is time to start sharing my previous Stor e Telling columns from Storytelling Magazine. The theme for this issue was Storytelling World. Get ready for a glamorous trip around the globe through these fabulous public domain folktale collections, including stories to celebrate Learn About Butterflies Day and World Rat Day.

I hope you find something useful and fun to add to your storytelling or classroom.




Belgian Fairy Tales by William Elliot Griffis, 1919 - Step into this enchanted text filled with queens, ogres, pilgrims and faeries.
The Bird of Truth and other Fairy Tales by Fernan Caballero – Thirty-three fairy tales collected by Fernan Caballero, a pseudonym for the woman who collected the majority of stories from Andalusia in Southern Spain.
https://tinyurl.com/ydyko3fl

Fables for the Frivolous (With Apologies To La Fontaine)
One of the earliest works by the American parodist Guy Wetmore Carryl, this collection of fables are adapted from Jean de La Fontaine’s Aesop-style originals from more than 200 years earlier.”
https://tinyurl.com/y77mdm8z

Folk-tales of Angola – Fifty tales collected and edited by Heli Chatelain, 1894 with Ki-mbundu text, literal English translation introduction and notes; stories of antelope, wolf, turtle, leopard, monkey and much more.

Folktales From Many Lands - From 1910 a fascinating book of twenty-three folktales from around the world. Exquisite illustrations complement each tale.
http://tinyurl.com/2janra

Folktales of Kashmir by James Hinton Knowles,1888 – “Many of these tales are probably pure Kashmiri in origin, while others are undoubtedly variants of popular tales, current in India and other parts, which have been adapted and modified to suit the language, style of thought, and social usages of the country.”
https://tinyurl.com/ycdrjrr4

March 14 is Learn About Butterflies Day. In some Irish folklore butterflies are 
referred to as ‘souls of the dead.’ Below you will find folktales from different 
cultures celebrating these beautiful insects.
Butterflies – Native American

The Butterfly Lovers - China

The Butterfly’s Wedding – Spain

The Princess and the Butterfly

The Wings of the Butterfly – South America
https://tinyurl.com/yc2dyp66

April 4 is World Rat Day. Adjectives used to describe them are clean, devoted,
intelligent and lovable so why not celebrate them with a few stories.
The Four Friends - India
https://tinyurl.com/y9u43r5j
How the Woman and the Rat Came to Stay in the Same House – South Sudan
https://tinyurl.com/ycscnjgj

The Husband of the Rat’s Daughter - Japan
https://tinyurl.com/y8z8wzhs

Rat Hall - Celtic
https://tinyurl.com/y965lhng
The Rat Princess - Japan
https://tinyurl.com/ycsaglax
Why the Cat Kills Rats - Nigeria
https://tinyurl.com/y7z6f3hv

SOMETHING NEW FOR THE NEW  YEAR

I thought it would be fun to share some different story openings and endings I find along the research road. Here is the first one for 2019.

"In the olden times, when there were sieves in straws and lies in everything, in the olden times when there was abundance, and men ate and drank the whole day and yet lay down hungry..."  
From The Three Orange-Peris https://archive.org/details/turkishfairytal00kngoog


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2020 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Tuesday, December 31, 2019

Crossing Over Into the New Year: Bridges in Folktales, Myths, and Legends

The Ponte Salario (The Old Bridge)
by
Hubert Robert, 1775
Soon the New Year will be here, a time to reflect on the past, rejoice in the future, and remember those who helped us along the way. I hope 2020 will find us all smiling more, laughing longer, and building bridges that will bring us all closer together. 

Wishing you the warmth of friends and family as we ring in a brand new decade full of positive possibilities!


STORIES

The Bloody Bridge – United States

The Bridge of the Gods – Native American

The Devil’s Bridge – Twelve versions from around the world.
http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type1191.html

Haunted Covered Bridges and Their Legends

The Legend of the Magpie Bridge – China
http://www.novareinna.com/festive/valmagpie.html

My Lord Bag of Rice - Japan

The Old Bridge – United States



The Pedlar of Swaffham - England

The Rainbow Bridge - Greece


Three Billy Goats Gruff – Various versions from around the world.
http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0122e.html

BOOKS

15 Adorable Children’s Books for Your Little Architects


CRAFTS

Building Bridges Engineering Activity - PreK

Suspension Bridge

CURRICULUM

The Three Billy Goats Gruff Steam Bridge Building Activity

SOMETHING EXTRA

Terri Windling – Troll Maidens and the Magic of Bridges



“So the bridge was mended and my story's ended.”
From Lady Featherflight in TheOak-Tree Fairy Book



Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2019 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.



Thursday, December 19, 2019

Toss Your Tale

A Game of Dice
by
William Joseph Shayer 1787-1879
I am always looking for new ways to help my storytelling students with their performance skills. This year I have quite a few students who speak very softly when sharing their stories. Of course we practice how to use a microphone but I always discuss that the microphone is there to assist them, not do the work for them. 

Recently, some of the students told their stories during class and I realized this would create a problem when they were telling from the stage. I improvised a game that day and asked for a volunteer to demonstrate the new activity. It was fitting that the child who volunteered is one of the quieter students. I happened to have a large, foam dice (found at the Dollar Store) in my rolling classroom (suitcase) that day and the new game Toss Your Tale was born.


Directions:
  • A student stands at one end of the room. The teacher stands at the other end. Make sure there is a good distance between you and the student.
  • The student tosses the dice as far as they choose and the teacher moves to that spot. (Interestingly, none of the students chose to throw it softly so it landed close to them but rather threw it as far as possible.)
  • The number rolled on the dice corresponds to what they will do, making sure their voice carries enough (without shouting) so the teacher can hear exactly what they are saying.
  • The teacher repeats what they have said to demonstrate that they have heard the student clearly.


Dice numbers:
  1. Share one line of story dialogue using the emotion you give them. For example, they may have to speak as if they are mad, happy, bored, frustrated, angry, etc.
  2. Describe a character from your story.
  3. Share something that is happening in the middle of your story.
  4. Tell the end of your story.
  5. Describe something from your story using one of your five senses: taste, touch, hearing, seeing, smell,
  6. Describe a gesture from your story, demonstrating and exaggerating it.

Of course, you may change the the choices for each of the numbers if you choose. If you have a large enough space, for example, if you have access to an auditorium, you could also play this game by breaking up the students into pairs. Each pair has one dice and the set of corresponding numbers above. All pairs play the game simultaneously; switching partners so each student has a chance to play the game,

The students enjoyed this game and everyone was able to use their voice effectively. A lovely side effect of this game was that the children instinctively added body language, facial expressions, and gestures, regardless of what number came up on the dice. It is my hope that the skill will carry through the next time we practice their stories.

The link below will lead you to another interactive game I invented for my students where I also use a foam dice.

Dicing Up Your Story
https://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/11/dicing-up-your-story-new-storytelling.html

These games are free for you to use in your work. However, I do ask that you respect copyright and offer attribution.
You can find additional original interactive activities and worksheets in my book Story by Story: Creating a Student Storytelling Troupe.

Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web links may change or  break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

  



Karen Chace 2019 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.



Thursday, December 5, 2019

Cooking Up Stories: Herbs and Spices in Folklore, Myth, and Legend

A Dinner of Herbs
by
George W. Joy
1844-1925

While National  Herb and Spices Day isn’t until June 10 the holiday season finds many of us baking and cooking up a storm. I thought I would share some of these tales now in case you want a taste of some stories to spice up your winter repertories.

Happy holidays one and all! May you be surrounded by those you love and those who love you.







STORIES

The Discovery of Salt – China

The Dreammaker – Scotland

Epsen Ashlad and Redfoks – Norway


King’s for Breakfast! - Hindu


Lion Who Took Woman’s Shape – South Africa
http://www.sacred-texts.com/afr/saft/sft39.htm

Love Like Salt Fourteen versions from around the world.

The Maiden Who Loved a Star – Native American
http://www.sacred-texts.com/nam/se/wsgr/wsgr20.htm

Redfox and Askeladden – Norway (An adapted version of Epsen Ashlad and Redfoks)

Salt - Russia

The Turtle and the Lizard - Philippines

Why Dogs Sniff - Portugal

CRAFTS

5 DIY Decorating Ideas to Deck the Halls (with Herbs!)

Cinnamon-n-Spice Ornaments Herbal Style

Cinnamon-n-Spice Ornaments Craft Style

Herbal Play Dough

RECIPES

Recipes with Spices and Herbs

A Taste of Home: 57 Recipes with Fresh Herbs

SOMETHING EXTRA

Granny Sue’s News and Reviews Herbal Legend and Lore: Rosemary, Sage, Fennel and Marjoram


Herb Facts for Kids

Herbal Folktales for Fall – This blog has wonderful information about herbs that would be delightful, educational additions to herbal stories in your repertoire.
https://blog.mountainroseherbs.com/herbal-folktales


Into the Woods: The Folklore of Food by Terri Windling
http://www.terriwindling.com/blog/2014/12/the-folklore-of-food.html


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2019 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.


Monday, November 25, 2019

Chinese New Year 2020: The Year of the Rat


The Chinese New Year of 2020 falls on January 25th and the festival will last to February 8th. According to the Chinese zodiac 2020 is a Year of the Rat.

  • The rat is the 1st animal in the Chinese Zodiac, an every 12th Chinese new year heralds the start of another year named for this clever animal.
  • It has characteristics of an animal with spirit, wit, alertness, delicacy, flexibility and vitality. In Chinese culture, rats were seen as a sign of wealth and surplus. Because of their reproduction rate, married couples also prayed to them for children
  • People born in the year of the rat are thought to be generous witty, alert, and flexible. On the other hand, they are also thought to be a bit stubborn and picky.
  • The recommended occupations for rats are artist, author, teacher and doctor.


The above information is shared from the following websites:


A well-known legend or origin of the Chinese Zodiac tells the tale of the Jade Emperor who invited the entire animal kingdom to take part in a race. The first 12 animals to cross the river would be assigned a year of the Chinese Zodiac system.

All of the animals were very excited and the news spread quickly. On the day of the race all of the animals gathered at the river and rat won the race. You see, although he was the smallest animal he used his bran and played a little trick! To read the rest of the story click the link below:

STORIES


The Monkey with the Tom –Tom – Southern India
https://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0170a.html#kingscote

The Pied Piper of Hamelin - Germany
And the poem written by Robert Browning with gorgeous illustrations here.
https://archive.org/details/piedpiperofhamel00brownyctest2


The Rat Princess - Japan

The Rats and Their Daughter - Japan

The Rat’s Wedding – Northern India
https://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0170a.html#steel 

The Story of a Monkey – Philippines
https://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0170a.html#cole

The Story of the Rat and Her Journey to God – Romania



BOOKS

Gift of Curiosity – Books About the Chinese New Year for Kids

CRAFTS AND ACTIVITIES

Education.com – Make a Chinese Zodiac Mask: Year of the Rat

Enchanted Learning – Crafts and Activities for the Chinese New Year

First Palette – Chinese Paper Lanterns

Make an Origami Rat

Printable Coloring Pages: Year of the Rat

FOOD

Food Network – Chinese New Year Recipes

SOMETHING EXTRA

Chinese New Year Taboos


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2019 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.