Thursday, December 12, 2013

Slow and Steady: Stor e Telling November December 2011

Tortoise and Hare
from
Children's Illustrations, 1880
I have penned the Stor E Telling column since January of 2002 and the articles from 2002-2006 are the publications page of my website found here http://tinyurl.com/llnn47y . I will be adding the columns from 2007 to 2012 to that page as well. However, I am in the process of checking what link URL's have changed or are now defunct. It is a time consuming process so I am taking the “slow and steady” approach via Aesop and will post the individual columns on my blog for now.

I will not be adding current columns until the following year, so if you want immediate access to the newest websites, consider becoming a member of the National Storytelling Network.Please feel free to comment on the blog and let me know if you find this useful.

 
NOVEMBER DECEMBER 2011

I offer you some sites to complement this issues theme.


CHINA

Chinese Wonder Book - Meet The Nodding Tiger, The Man Who Would Not Scold, among others in these fifteen stories from Norman Hinsdale Pitman, c. 1919.
http://tinyurl.com/3jzdjmf

Chinese Fables and Folk Stories – Download this free book by Mary Hayes Davis, Chow-Leung, published in 1908.
http://tinyurl.com/yda28q4

Storybug.net – This link will lead to a blog post I wrote in 2008 to Celebrate the Chinese New Year. You will find additional stories and resources there.
http://tinyurl.com/yfqejbk


JAPAN

Kid’s Web Japan - “Folk Legends of Japan… boy heroes, terrible ogres, animal antics, and more.”
http://tinyurl.com/3zzy3w2

Children of the Camps – Internment History – From the Public Broadcast System (PBS)
http://tinyurl.com/3eejcrk

Smithsonian Education: Letters from the Japanese American Internment –A children’s librarian in San Diego gave stamped, self-addressed postcards to Japanese American’s sent away. She urged them to write to her. In 1993 more than 250 postcards and letters were donated to the museum.
http://tinyurl.com/3ptbp6a

Smithsonian Education – A set of lesson plans for grades K–12. Historical documents, information on the camps and a timeline tell this tragic tale.
http://tinyurl.com/3rgkomt

Tales of Japan: Sharing Their Stories – A blog post I wrote in reaction to the devastating earthquake in Japan, containing seven public domain books of Japanese folktales. Each book is a free download.
http://tinyurl.com/42rt96x

 
MIDDLE EAST

Ali Cogia & the Merchant of Baghdad – A folktale from Iraq.
http://tinyurl.com/44enm82

The Bronze Ring – From the Middle East or Central Asia. http://mythfolklore.net/andrewlang/325.htm

The Enchanted Storks: A Tale of Bagdad - Retold by Aaron Shepard
http://tinyurl.com/3ka43do

The Gifts of Wali Dad – A Tale of India and Pakistan retold Aaron Shepard.
http://tinyurl.com/3ot3945

The Three Princes – Saudi Arabia
http://tinyurl.com/3uzufjq

Kashmiri Folktales -Folktales and information on culture, religion, customs and music of the Kashmir people.
http://www.koausa.org/folktales/

Nasreddin Hodja - A collection of stories from the Middle East would not be complete without Hodja! Contains a historical introduction and bibliography.
http://tinyurl.com/3nd6brq

 
November is National American Indian Heritage Month. Below are four sites filled with legends and myths from many nations.

The Algonquin Legends of New England by Charles G. Leland, c. 1894.  “This work contains a
collection of the myths, legends, and folk-lore of the principal Wabanaki, or Northeastern Algonquin,
Indians…”
http://tinyurl.com/3d2b5nk

The Encyclopedia of Hotcâk (Winnebago) Mythology - The most comprehensive site I have found on Native American folktales.  There is an extensive index of stories by subject matter, myths, maps, and legends.
http://hotcakencyclopedia.com/

Myths and Legends for American Indian Youth
An extensive list of Native American tales from various tribes that "represent large themes of human existence: where we came from, how we should live, reconciliation to the tragedies of life. There are smaller stories: teaching, humorous, answering "Why?" questions about natural phenomena and behavior."
http://tinyurl.com/3jlobp6

And if you missed any of the previous “Slow and Steady…” blog posts here are the links to the series so far.

2007


2008


2009


 2010


2011

April May 2011
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/11/slow-and-steady-stor-e-telling-april.html 
July August 2011
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/slow-and-steady-stor-e-telling-july.html
September October 2011
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/slow-and-steady-stor-e-telling.html

 

Karen Chace 2013 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

 

 

 

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Celebrate the New Year in Style with the Small Ones

Father Time
by
Edmund Dulac, 1906
Last year I offered a lapsit program to celebrate the New Year. Listed below are the fingerplays, songs and story stretchers I used in the program. These are found all over the Internet without attribution so please to feel free to use them in your work.

I hope you will find something to use with your little ones.  If you do, please let me know how much fun you had!






FINGERPLAYS/ACTION RHYMES

January

January's a very cold month,
Shiver, shiver, shiver, (Hug yourself and pretend to shiver.)
Button up and cover your ears, (Pretend to button coat: cover ears with your hands.)
Or quiver, quiver, quiver. (Shake all over)


Five Little Snowmen (Tune: Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed)

Five little snowmen riding on a sled,
One fell off and bumped his head,
Frosty called the doctor and the doctor said,
No more snowmen riding on that sled!

Count down from four to one…

No more snowmen riding on the sled
Mother but them all to bed!

SONG

Cheer the Year (Tune: Row, Row, Row Your Boat)

Cheer, cheer, cheer the year,
A new one's just begun.
Celebrate with all your friends,
Let's go have some fun!
Clap, clap, clap your hands,
A brand new year is here.
Learning, laughing, singing, clapping,
Through another year.

STORY STRETCHERS

The People on the Bus (Tune: The Wheels On The Bus)

Oh, the people on the bus wear party hats,
Party hats, party hats. (Children place hands together in a point over their heads)
Oh, the people on the bus wear party hats,
All through the town.

Oh, the people on the bus are blowing horns,
Blowing horns, blowing horns. (Children place fist over their mouth)
Oh the people on the bus are blowing horns,
All through the town.

Oh, the people on the bus say, “Happy New Year”,
“Happy New Year”, “Happy New Year”.
Oh, the people on the bus say, “Happy New Year”,
All through the town.


STORY STRETCHERS

A New Year Has Begun (Tune: If You're Happy and You Know It)

A new year has begun -- clap your hands! {clap} {clap}
A new year has begun -- clap your hands! {clap} {clap}
A new year has begun; a new year has begun;
A new year has begun -- clap your hands! {clap} {clap}

A new year has begun -- stomp your feet! {stomp} {stomp}
A new year has begun -- stomp your feet! {stomp} {stomp}
A new year has begun; a new year has begun;
A new year has begun -- stomp your feet! {stomp} {stomp}

A new year has begun -- give a shout! HURRAH!
A new year has begun -- give a shout! HURRAH!
A new year has begun; a new year has begun;
A new year has begun -- give a shout! HURRAH!

A new year has begun -- give a shout!

  
For additional New Year’s Day resources visit Preschool Express. http://www.preschoolexpress.com/music_station05/music_station_jan05.shtml 



BOOKS

Apples4theteacher.com – A lovely list of children’s books to celebrate the New Year.

CRAFTS

Spoonful.com – A number of cute, easy and inexpensive crafts for the small ones.

MISCELLANEOUS

Enchanted Learning – Say "Happy New Year" in many languages.

Karen Chace 2013 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.


Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Slow and Steady: Stor e Telling September October 2011

Tortoise and Hare
from
Children's Illustrations, 1880
I have penned the Stor E Telling column since January of 2002 and the articles from 2002-2006 are the publications page of my website found here http://tinyurl.com/llnn47y . I will be adding the columns from 2007 to 2012 to that page as well. However, I am in the process of checking what link URL's have changed or are now defunct. It is a time consuming process so I am taking the “slow and steady” approach via Aesop and will post the individual columns on my blog for now.

I will not be adding current columns until the following year, so if you want immediate access to the newest websites, consider becoming a member of the National Storytelling Network. Please feel free to comment on the blog and let me know if you find this useful.

September October 2011

Since this issues theme centers on epic storytelling I offer you some epic tales from around the globe.

The Book of the Epic – The Words Great Epics Told in Story by H. A. Guerber, 1913. This free, downloadable book contains epics from around the world.
http://tinyurl.com/6edwz4f

The Epic of Gilgamesh – “The Epic of Gilgamesh is, perhaps, the oldest written story on Earth. It comes to us from Ancient Sumeria, and was originally written on 12 clay tablets in cuneiform script. It is about the adventures of the historical King of Uruk somewhere between 2750 and 2500 BCE.” 
http://tinyurl.com/6krop7p

The Mahabharata and the Ramayana are the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India. Both are now found online and the links are found below. This link is an abridged verse translation of the two longest epic poems in world literature.
http://www.sacred-texts.com/hin/dutt/index.htm

The Mahabharata translated by Kisari Mohan Ganguli, 1883-1896.
http://tinyurl.com/5todwvx

The Ramayana – translated by Ralph T.H. Griffith, M.A., 1870-1874.
http://tinyurl.com/68np9he

September 21 is International Day of Peace. Below are two sites with curriculum resources to complement your stories.

For the Sake of the Children – Free peace building guide with storytelling activities for teachers, parents and adults who work with children
http://tinyurl.com/6ku9lgw

Minnesota Center Against Violence and Abuse - Curriculum information for grades 1-6 along with a bibliography and profiles of peacemakers throughout history.
http://tinyurl.com/6k6pmup

September 23 is Native American Day; some story sites to celebrate the culture.

Indian Why Stories – Sparks from War Eagle’s Lodge-Fire – Twenty-two stories collected by Frank B. Linderman, 1915.
http://tinyurl.com/63sovcu

Native Languages of the Americas: Wampanoag Indian Legends - Moshup the Giant, Squant the Sea Monster and more. There are also additional links and resources to help you learn more about this Indian nation.
http://tinyurl.com/l5tx8x

Native American Trickster Tales - While the title suggests the site is devoted to the Native American trickster, there are in fact, stories, links, articles and scholarly discussions from around the world.

October 9 is Leif Erickson Day. Here are some stories from the north to honor this Viking explorer.

Popular Tales of the Norse – Fifty nine tales including information on the mythology
http://tinyurl.com/6xktya4

Yule-tide stories: A collection of Scandinavian and North German popular tales and traditions, from the Swedish, Danish and German, 1910. This book can be downloaded to your computer or Kindle. 
http://tinyurl.com/6k57ktf

It wouldn’t be October without some tales to terrify!

Crabtree Books – While this book doesn’t fall into the category of terrifying it is full of fun for Halloween, offering stories, rhymes, costume ideas, recipes and more. It is a free pdf file and downloads quickly.
http://tinyurl.com/2wt5l7l

Russian Folk-tales by William R. S. Ralston - Just in time for All Hallow’s Eve. Download this book from 1880, full of myths, legends, and folktales of demons, witches, vampires and ghouls if you dare!
http://tinyurl.com/lnvh8mq

Ghouls, Ghosts and Goblins – This is a link to one of my blog posts from 2010 offering a variety of story sites, curriculum and crafts to make your Halloween programs simply frightfully good.
http://tinyurl.com/5s9qee6


And if you missed any of the previous “Slow and Steady…” blog posts here are the links to the series so far.

2007


2008


2009


2010


2011

April May 2011
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/11/slow-and-steady-stor-e-telling-april.html 
July August 2011
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/slow-and-steady-stor-e-telling-july.html


Karen Chace 2013 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.