Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Race Your Mouse Day! Fun for the Wee Ones

The Chase of the White Mouse
by
John Anster Fizgerald
1832-1906
August 28 is Race Your Mouse Day. Who knew? Below are some fun fingerplays, songs, stories, crafts and more to help you celebrate the day. On your mark, get set, GO!







COUNTING AND FINGERPLAYS

Five Little Mice

Five little mice on the pantry floor,
This little mouse peeked behind the door.
This little mouse nibbled at the cake,
This little mouse not a sound did make.
This little mouse heard the kitten sneeze.
 "Ah Choo," sneezed the kitten,
And, "Squeak," they all cried,
And they found a hole and ran inside.

Little Mousie

Here's a little mousie
Peeking through a hole. (Poke index finger of one hand through fist of the other hand.)
Peek to the left. (Wiggle finger to the left.)
Peek to the right. (Wiggle finger to the right.)
Pull your head back in, (Pull finger into fist.)
There's a cat in sight!

The Quiet Mouse

Once their lived a quiet mouse. (Hold up finger)
In a little quiet house. (Cover finger with other hand)
When all was quiet as can be (Whisper this line)
OUT POPPED HE! (Should the line then pull finger out of hand)


SONGS

Hickory Dickory Dock

Hickory Dickory dock,
The mouse ran up the clock,
The clock struck one
The mouse ran down,
Hickory Dickory dock.

Hickory Dickory dock,
The mouse ran up the clock,
The clock struck two
And down he flew,
Hickory Dickory dock.

Hickory Dickory dock,
The mouse ran up the clock,
The clock struck three
And he did flee,
Hickory Dickory dock.

Hickory Dickory dock,
The mouse ran up the clock,
The clock struck four,
He hit the floor,
Hickory Dickory dock.

Hickory Dickory dock,
The mouse ran up the clock,
The clock struck five,
The mouse took a dive,
Hickory Dickory dock.

The Tail of a Mouse (sung to The Wheels on the Bus)

The tail of a mouse curls round and round                       
Round and round, round and round
The tail of a mouse curls round and round
All through the house.

The mouth of a mouse goes squeak, squeak, squeak
Squeak, squeak, squeak. Squeak, squeak, squeak
The mouth of a mouse goes squeak, squeak, squeak
All through the house.
The nose of a mouse goes sniff, sniff, sniff
Sniff, sniff, sniff. Sniff, sniff, sniff.
The nose of a mouse goes sniff, sniff,sniff
All through the house.

The feet of a mouse go scurry, scurry, scurry
Scurry, scurry, scurry. Scurry, scurry, scurry
The feet of a mouse go scurry, scurry, scurry
All through the house.
The ears of a mouse go twitch, twitch, twitch
Twitch, twitch, twitch. Twitch, twitch, twitch
The ears of a mouse go twitch, twitch, twitch
All through the house..


STORIES


Cat and Mouse in Partnership - Germany


The Lion and the Mouse - Greece

The Princess Mouse - Finland

The Queen and the Mouse - France

The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse - Aesop
http://mythfolklore.net/aesopica/milowinter/11.htm


STORY STRETCH

Ears and Whiskers, Tail and Feet (Tune: Head, Shoulers, Knees and Toes)

Ears and whiskers, tail and feet, tail and feet.
Ears and whiskers, tail and feet, tail and feet.
Pet my fur and give a little squeak!
Ears and whiskers, tail and feet, tail and feet.
Source: King County Library System

BOOKS

LibraryThing.com – EEK! A Mouse – Best selling children’s books with a mouse protagonist.
https://www.librarything.com/list/523/all/EEK!-A-Mouse-Best-Childrens-Books

Mouses First Halloween -  I purchased this book last year and it became and instant favorite of my two toddler grandsons. It is requested over and over again and my oldest, now four, insists on ‘reading’ the book to me now; he has memorized the story and can repeat the it based on the pictures. So much fun!

CRAFTS

Mouse Crafts and Activities for Kids
http://www.dltk-kids.com/animals/pets-mouse.htm

SOMETHING EXTRA


Literacy Tip: Children who look at books and hear stories read aloud learn that words and ideas can be written down and that marks on paper have meaning.
cable9.dyndns.org/


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2017 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Stor e Telling October November December 2016: Interfaith Storytelling

Grace
by
Eric Enstrom, 1918

This is the final installment of my 2016 Stor e Telling columns for the National Storytelling Magazine. The theme of this issue was Interfaith Storytelling and I being with  resources to complement the Interfaith Storytelling theme for this issue.



Doho International Center for Interfaith Dialogue
– You will find many resources at this site, including access to their journal publication, books, newsletter and more.
http://www.dicid.org/english/index.php

Inspired to Serve “This resource provides the rationale, practical steps, and tools needed to engage in youth-led interfaith service-learning.” Make sure to visit their Tools and Resources page, full of valuable information.

Interfaith.org“The world’s largest, independent faith website. Explore the world's major religions: Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Shinto, Sikhism, Taoism.” There are also resources on ancient mythology, alternative spirituality and a library. http://www.interfaith.org/

Interfaith Youth Core – A useful site for those who wish to learn more about bringing interfaith cooperation to university campuses, and their surrounding communities. It provides webinars, podcasts, videos, classroom tools, downloadable PDFs, and a library of useful resources. https://www.ifyc.org/the-interfaith-story

Spiritual Stories.com – A variety of stories, Buddhist, Zen, Sufi, Jewish, Christian and Nasreddin await you.

BOOKS 

Building the Interfaith Youth Movement: Beyond Dialogue to Action

Journey Into an Interfaith World: Jews, Christians, and Muslims in a World Come of Age

Children’s Books with Muslim and Related Cultural Themes 

November 17 is Homemade Bread Day; I offer you some delicious stories to feast upon.

The Baker’s Daughter - England

The Dream Bread – Seven stories on the theme by D.L. Ashliman.
http://tinyurl.com/zymbe63

The Dun Horse - Russia
http://tinyurl.com/66tm5m5

Five Loaves - Romania

The Icon’s Warm Bread – Greece
http://tinyurl.com/mqsv3jd

The King’s Loaves – Afghanistan
http://tinyurl.com/zp73fx7

December 14 is International Monkey Day so peel a banana and celebrate!

The Dragonflies and the Monkeys – Philippines
http://tinyurl.com/jmvyha7

The Frog and the Black-Handed Monkey - Africa

The Birds and the Shivering Monkeys - India
http://tinyurl.com/j6u9w83

The Elephant and the Monkey - India

How the Monkeys Saved the Fish – Tanzania
http://tinyurl.com/jq88xvf

The Monkey and the Lion – Bahrain
http://tinyurl.com/jefhzvp

The Quarrel of the Monkey and the Crab - Japan

Why the Banana’s Belong to the Monkey – Brazil
http://tinyurl.com/jxqeub7

Monkeying Around: Songs and Fingerplays for the Wee OnesA blog post I put together for our younger audiences.

SOMETHING EXTRA

Jewish Fairytales and Legends by Gertrude Landa, 1919Tales from the Talmud and Midrash, “infused with the perennial Jewish struggle for survival and dignity, as well as a large helping of gentle humor.”
http://tinyurl.com/5s762z

Once Upon a Time – A Collection of Buddhist Stories – “…simple and yet moving stories…pointing fingers to the gateway of spirituality.”
http://tinyurl.com/j4mtykc

Speak Bird, Speak Again - A book of Palestinian Arab Folktales from Ibrahim Muhawi and Sharif Kanaana.
http://tinyurl.com/hcxgs2x


If you missed the other installments from 2016, the links below will take you to each one.

Stor e Telling August September 2016: Environmental Stories
Stor e Telling June July 2016: Reprise
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/02/stor-e-telling-june-july-2016-reprise.html

Stor e Telling: April May 2016: Storytelling World Awards
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/01/stor-e-telling-april-may-2016.html

Stor e Telling January February March 2016 - Humor

http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/01/stor-e-telling-january-february-march.html


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2017 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.


Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Stor e Telling August September 2016: Environmental Stories

Breton Brother and Sister
William Bouguereau 1825–1905 
The theme for this issue of the National Storytelling Magazine was the environment so it is appropriate I share this with you now since Earth Day is April 22, 2017.  Below are resources to complement our environment, including animals, flora, fauna and nature. You will also find curriculum resources to supplement your repertoire.

STORIES

The Book of Nature Myths by Florence Holbrook, 1904. Fifty-nine stories nature myths including Why the Peacock’s Tail Has a Hundred Eyes, and many more.
http://tinyurl.com/hlf9juk

H-NILAS: Stories for the Seasons - I shared this site back in 2002 and they have continued to add to their resources; an excellent array of seasonal stories, adapted by storyteller Cathy Mosley.

Myths and Legends of Flowers, Trees, Fruits and Plants by Charles M. Skinner, 1911. This book offers many stories, some very short, others more fully formed; a helpful book for background information when you are planning a nature program.

Plant Myths and Legends – As with the book above, it would be useful if you were researching specific stories but would need to be fleshed out more fully for your repertoire.
http://tinyurl.com/h9ywrtg

Rumanian Bird and Beast Stories, by M. Gastor, Ph.d, 1915. Dozens of pourquoi tales at your fingertips. 

Spirit of Trees - I’ve shared this site before but it certainly bears repeating. This growing website offers curricular resources, essays, organizational links, poetry and folktales from some of our leading storytellers and scholars.

Ten Ancient Stories and the Geological Events that May Have Inspired Them– From Smithsonian Magazine, “There's no way of telling which came first, the disaster or the story. But tales can provide clues to the past…”
http://tinyurl.com/zep6nkp

CURRICULUM

Animals and Humans in Cooperation and Conflict – From the National Council of the Humanities, three lesson activities, questions, and stories for the classroom.
http://tinyurl.com/jztmltp

Teaching Environmental Education Using the Shona Folktales – “This paper examines the implications of using the Shona folktale as a tool and method for teaching environmental education (EE)…” There are also three folktales to complement the text.

Getting Wild About Environmental Literature – If you’re planning a program about the environment this will be invaluable resource; a bibliography of a 122 topics related to wildlife and the environment.
http://tinyurl.com/j5vkkx4

August 11 is Son and Daughter Day in the United States. Here are some stories to help you celebrate the special children in your life.

The Bear Who Married a Peasant’s Daughter - Latvia

The Devoted Daughter – Korea
http://tinyurl.com/zeu9g66

The Disobedient Son – South America

The Dragon King’s Daughter - China

The Four Puppets - Burma

One Man and His Precious Cow - Nigeria

The Mason and His Son - Italy

The Sad Story of the Yaoya’s Daughter - Japan

The Samurai’s Daughter – Japan
http://tinyurl.com/ztnfg4q

The Sea King’s Daughter
http://tinyurl.com/mdprd88

The Snake and the King’s Daughter

The Tale of Two Sons – India



Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2017 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.


Friday, April 14, 2017

Sensory Swish: An Interactive Storytelling Game

Last week I made my annual run for Easter basket goodies and found some delightfully different ‘baskets,’ pictured below, at my local Dollar Tree.  Rather than the traditional woven straw they were made to look like basketballs and I began to wonder, “How could I use these with my storytelling students?” 

Although my Storytelling Troupe classes have ended for the year, my colleague Andrea Lovett and I are currently working with students on an intergenerational project.  While we have many resources at our disposal we are always eager to add new games/movement to our classes.  I placed the baskets in my cart and continued walking through the store, and lo and behold, I found small, rubber basketballs. Now I knew this was too much of a coincidence and the Sensory Swish game was born!
  
SENSORY SWISH
 * Swish: A shot that goes through the basket without touching the backboard or rim.



Items Needed
  • 5 Basketball ‘baskets’
  • 10 small rubber basketballs (10 so you will have additional balls to hand the children if they miss.)

Easy Prep
  • Cut off the basket straps so they will not be in the way when throwing the ball.
  • Type up the five senses on the computer in large letters: Taste, Touch, See, Smell, Hear
  • Paste one each on front of the baskets. Cover with clear postal tape to secure.

Directions
  • Place five chairs in a straight row across.
  • Place one basket on each chair.
  • Place something heavy inside so they will not fall over when the ball is thrown.
  • Students take turns throwing the ball at the basket of their choice.
  • They have three turns at the throw line. If they miss they take one step closer.
  • When the ball lands in one basket (it might not be one they were aiming for) they choose any part of their story and share one or two sentences describing something in the story using that ‘sense.’

Example: One student yesterday chose ‘smell’ and made the basket. She shared, “When I walked downstairs in the morning I could smell the delicious, crisp bacon sizzling on the stove.”

The students really enjoyed the game and cheered each other on. It was particularly fun because two of the girls actually completed the ‘swish’ on the first try while the boys did not, resulting in lots of laughter and good natured ribbing.

This game is a keeper and I actually purchased an additional set of ‘baskets.’ In the next school year when I begin working with a larger storytelling troupe I will turn this into a team relay game.

SENSORY SWISH RELAY

  • There will be two sections of senses, one for each team.
  • Students will line up in two teams.
  • When the first makes the basket they will share a sentence from their story, run back and tag the next team member.
  • Repeat until everyone on one team has completed the activity.
  • First team to finish is the winning team.

* Note: I plan to have 10 additional small basketballs for a total of 20 when using this in the relay form of the game. This will make it easier to keep the game moving along.

I can also see this game being used in other ways, labeling the baskets differently. You can even use the same baskets, just tape new labels on the opposite side. Some suggestions:

  • Exaggerated Gesture
  • Small Gesture
  • Character Description
  • Dialogue
  • Facial Expression
  • First Sentence
  • Last Sentence
  • Etc.

This is a very easy game to set up and play. I offer it here for you to use in your personal storytelling work. It is not to be published in any form without permission although you may share the blog link with your colleagues. I ask that you respect copyright and offer attribution whenever you use it.

Here is another interactive game I created last year using the favorite American pastime, baseball! 
Step Up to the Plate: An Interactive Storytelling Game http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2016/03/step-up-to-story-plate-interactive.html

I would love to know what you think of this game, and if you use it, tell me how it worked out for you!


If you are interested in more original, interactive games, as well as story worksheets, please consider my award-winning book, Story by Story: Creating a Student Storytelling Troupe. I am also offering a workshop, Story Play, based on my book, at the Rocky Mountain Storytelling Conference in Colorado next week and at the National Storytelling Conference in Kansas City, Missouri in June. You will learn additional activities not found in my book, to help both you and your students.

If you would like to learn a bit more about the workshop head over to my NSN blog piece at
http://blog.storynet.org/play-with-a-purpose .

Rocky Mountain Conference information found at http://rmstory.org/conference/overview/

National Storytelling Conference information found at http://storynet.org/conference/index.html


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web links may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2017 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.


Thursday, February 16, 2017

Play with a Purpose: Story Play

Ring Around the Rosie
by Edward Henry Potthast,1910-1915
Below is an article I wrote last year for the Northeast Storytelling organization. I was honored to present a new workshop, Story Play, at their 2016 Conference in Amherst, MA. 

This year, I am equally honored to bring this workshop, based on my award winning book, Story by Story: Creating a Student Storytelling Troupe, to the 
National Storytelling Conference in Kansas City, MO. The theme is "All Our Voices: Stories of Immigration and Migration" and there will be workshops and intensives on storytelling, business, education, cultural heritage and so much more.
For information go to http://www.storynet.org/conference/ . Workshop descriptions will be added very soon so be sure to bookmark the site.

“Play is often talked about as if it were a relief from serious learning. But for children play is serious learning. Play is really the work of childhood.”                                                                                                  Fred Rogers                                          
Play with a Purpose!
From the moment my students stepped into the room for the after school storytelling program, ‘after school’ being the operative words, I was already at a disadvantage. By then they had been sitting at their desks for almost five hours, with only 20 minutes for recess, barely any time at all to add movement and play to their day. How could I keep them motivated through 13 weeks of class, especially for those students who return year after year?
  I quickly learned that play and movement were two key ingredients.

While I began to create different worksheets to help them sequence and visualize their folktales, I knew it was equally important to get them on their feet, let their bodies feel the stories. Sometimes it was a combination of both. One of my newest creations, Exaggeration Station, was a perfect marriage of the two. The objective is to encourage them to play with the elements of their story.

I prepared a worksheet for the students to complete before the game, which mirrored the nine poster boards placed around the room; this gave them a chance to think through their choices. Since we were in the school library I used the book stands for the poster boards, placing them on the shelves, no higher than eye level. They were organized in a pattern that wove them up and down the aisles so the children could easily move through the game. We immediately followed up with Walk the Talk, another movement activity, and they quickly incorporated what they discovered while playing Exaggeration Station.

More than once I've reconfigured a childhood game into a new classroom activity. Sometimes inspiration comes in an instant in the most unexpected places. One day I was working with my third grade storytelling troupe. We were using the school hallway for a version of The Virginia Reel. Rather than standing still and facing each other, they were paired up, walking side by side, one teller sharing their tale with their partner. As they were executing the activity I suddenly noticed two girls reach out to hold hands. Immediately, the memory of an old schoolyard game popped into my head and a brand new activity, Red Rover, Red Rover Send Story Right Over, was born.

Another day we began by completing the written exercise, Language Ladders. Immediately after finishing their worksheets I cued up the music and we began to “Dialogue and Dance!” By merging the tactile exercise of writing, then quickly moving to an interactive game utilizing their new story dialogue, it reinforced and stimulated their work.

After fifteen years of teaching I still continue to think about new ways to bring movement into the classroom. It’s no surprise we all love to play so why not incorporate as much as possible into our day and play with a purpose!
  
Want to add some more play to your classroom, to your storytelling? Whether you are a beginning or experienced storyteller, you will find something to add to your story toolbox. Register for my workshop, Story Play, at the National Storytelling Conference this summer and I promise we will have fun...and chocolates!












2016 Recipient Storytelling World Honor Award
2011 Recipient Anne Izard Storytellers' Choice Award
Available at www.amazon.com or http://www.parkhurstbrothers.com/ 


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2017 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.


Sunday, February 12, 2017

Stor e Telling June July 2016: Reprise

The Storyteller
by
Der Erzahler, 1805
This is the third Stor e Telling installment from 2016. This issue was a reprise of the ‘best of the best’ offered through the years. I did the same with my column and culled through my extensive archives, dating back to 2002, bringing you a reprise of some of my favorite storytelling websites.


4 to 40
Folktales and stories from around the world, including Jakarta, Estonia, Ukraine, and more.
http://tinyurl.com/2965eu 

Absolutely Whootie: Stories to Grow By
Multicultural folktales searchable by continent and country, and play scripts as well. It also offers stories categorized by themes to foster positive behavior and reinforcement.

The Baldwin Project
A comprehensive collection of literature in the public domain; read tales from as far back as 1880.
http://tinyurl.com/jpcpx6m

Chinese Legends, Or, The Porcelain Tower
There are many wonderful myths, folktales and legends from China is this 1848 book by Thomas Henry Sealy, now in the public domain.

Fairy Tales from Brazil: How and Why Tales from Brazilian Folk-lore
Enjoy eighteen pourquoi tales collected by Elsie Spicer Eells from1917.
http://tinyurl.com/k42zduv

The Golden Rod Fairy Book
Published in 1903; stories from England, France, Poland, Bohemia, Russia, India, China, Italy, Denmark, Ireland and Spain are contained within.

Learning to Give
Lesson plans, complimentary folktales, and parent resources to involve students in philanthropy and serving their communities.

Mysterious Britain
Banshees, selkies, giants and dragons are but a few of the folktales and legends from England, Wales and Scotland.
http://tinyurl.com/ld7gro

Myths, Folktales and Fairytales
Explore folklore with Nina Jaffe, experience a storytelling workshop with Gerald Fierst or a myth writing workshop with Jane Yolen. There are teacher guides, assessments, rubrics, and stories.
http://tinyurl.com/2z2ogy

Orkneyjar - The Heritage of the Orkney Islands
Tradition, folklore and more; enjoy the beauty and history of the Orkney Islands.

Sacred Text Archives                    
Explore the world through this amazing collection of texts on religion, mythology, legends, folklore, and more.                                                        

Scottish Fairy and Folk TalesA lovely collection of Scottish fairy and folk tales from 1901.

Speak Bird, Speak Again
A book of Palestinian Arab Folktales from Ibrahim Muhawi and Sharif Kanaana.

Tales of Laughter
A collection tales from Ireland, Spain, France, Russia and other countries from around the globe. They are sure to have you smiling with delight!

Tales of the Punjab: Told by the People
A wonderful collection of Eastern Indian tales with notes to the stories.

Teaching with Folklore Index
An entry point for busy teachers who wish to use folklore with their class; the resources are aimed mainly at elementary grades one to six.

Women and the Sea
A valuable collection of resources outlining women’s experiences and contributions as sailors, lighthouse keepers, yachting, mermaid myths, and more. There is also an extensive bibliography.

If you missed the first 2016 installment you may access it here:

January February March 2016 – Humor
The theme for this issue was humor so you will find some noddlehead stories to make you smile. Also, there are tales to celebrate Candlemas, St. Patrick's Day, National Pig Day, and a few extra goodies.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/01/stor-e-telling-january-february-march.html 

April Mary 2016 – Storytelling World Awards
This is the second installment of my 2016 Stor e Telling column from Storytelling Magazine. The theme was Storytelling World Awards. You will find downloadable public domain books from around the world, stories to celebrate Red Rose Day and Mother's Day, and a few other resources, including links to all of the other columns, dating back to 2007. Have fun surfing!

If you are interested in the previous Stor e Telling columns you will find them all at the links below. Each section has a short synopsis to make it easier for you to find what interests you.

From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources III: Stor e Tellng 2015
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/01/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html 

 

From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources II: Stor e Telling 2014


From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources: Stor e Telling 2013
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/06/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html

Stor e Telling Columns: 2007 to 2012 with Synopses
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/stor-e-telling-columns-2007-to-2012.html

In addition, all of my Stor e Telling columns in Storytelling Magazine from 2002-2006 are listed on the Publication’s Page on my website. One caveat, I have not had the opportunity to recheck all of the links; that is a project for another day. You will find a point and click extravaganza of story research here:
http://storybug.net/stor-e-telling.html


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2017 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.