Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Stor e Telling Fall 2018: Storytelling and Empathy


Young Man with a Candle
Michel Gobin, 1685
Empathy is an important part of our humanity. Below are some links to complement this issues theme and explore how it relates to our storytelling work and life.

The first three links “… explore how stories serve important functions in our day-to-day life, a reality that social justice advocates can harness for awareness raising and motivating public action…this series will illuminate the “why” behind the human love of stories.”





Wired for Empathy: Why We Can’t Resist Good Narrative
Part One focuses “on the brain’s response to stories, and why stories are so prevalent in all human societies from an evolutionary perspective.”

Wired for Empathy: How and Why Stories Cultivate Emotions
Part Two “takes this foundation and connects it to empathy development and what this means for crafting effective advocacy stories, with an emphasis on homelessness.”
https://tinyurl.com/yafbpjwr

Empathy, Neurochemistry, and the Dramatic Arc
Part Three discusses “how to use stories to reach challenging audiences, with an analysis of how affluence and power impacts empathy.
https://tinyurl.com/h34mjk2

How We Can Develop Empathy Through StorytellingWhen a personal story is being shared we unconsciously create an emotional connection with the storyteller and empathize with their experience… and therefore, helps us develop empathy towards people that were once strangers.” This article also includes a link to a powerful Tedx talk on the subject of Empathy to Combat Social Violence.
In the United States pumpkins dot the landscape in gardens and on front porches. Below are a few pumpkin tales to help you celebrate the lovely autumn season.

The Great Pumpkin – Taino Indian/Puerto Rico

Grinding Stone to the Rescue - India

The Legend of Stingy Jack - Ireland

The Magic Pumpkins – Ukraine
https://tinyurl.com/ybqo2lr4

The Pumpkin in the Jar – Philippines
https://tinyurl.com/y7a4cgw2

It’s Harvest Time! Apple and Pumpkin Fun for the Wee Ones – I’ve shared this before but thought it would  be worthwhile to share once more. Fingerplays, songs and more to make your lapsit program shine.
http://tinyurl.com/nrluwpj

December 7 is the Feast of Saint Ambrose, patron saint of candle makers. Here are some folktales to add some light to a dark winter night.

The Candles of Life: The Story of a Child for Whom Death Stood Godmother Czechoslovakia
h
ttps://tinyurl.com/y7uk7j4s

Chanukah Candles in Chelm – Poland
The link leads to a pdf file chock full of Chelm tales. You will find this story on page 58.
https://tinyurl.com/yalfq5mg

The Iron Man - Germany

I Know What I Know - Denmark

The Rose Tree - England

The Twist Mouth Family


SOMETHING EXTRA

Stor e Telling Spring 2018: Storytelling World
Seven public domain resources filled with stories from Holland, Breffny, South Africa, Scotland and more. Keep reading for stories to celebrate the national holiday in Turkmenistan known as A Drop of Water Is a Grain of Gold, to celebrate our precious resource, water.
https://karenchace.blogspot.com/2019/01/stor-e-telling-spring-2018-storytelling.html

Stor e Telling Spring 2018: Storytelling World
The theme was Storytelling World so you will find tales from many cultures. There are also legends to savor on Tea for Two Tuesday on March 21, Noodlehead tales to tickle your funny for International Moment of Laughter Day on April 14, and folktales for Bat Appreciation Day on April 17.
https://karenchace.blogspot.com/2019/01/stor-e-telling-spring-2018-storytelling.html

1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources V: Stor e Telling 2017
https://karenchace.blogspot.com/2018/12/1001-nights-to-2001-story-resources-v.html

1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources IV: Stor e Telling 2016

From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources III: Stor e Telling 2015
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/01/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html

From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources II: Stor e Telling 2014

http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2016/01/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html

From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources: Stor e Telling 2013
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/06/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html

Stor e Telling Columns: 2007 to 2012 with Synopses
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/stor-e-telling-columns-2007-to-2012.html

Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web links may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2019 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Thursday, July 18, 2019

A Universe of Stories: Lots of Fun for the Wee Ones


This year the Summer Reading Program theme is ‘A Universe of Stories.’ I put together a list of fingerplays, crafts, songs and more to delight your young audiences. All of these resources are found on the Internet, they are not mine.

However, the story stretch at the end, My Aunt Came Back From the Milky Way, is my own creation.
You are welcome to use it in your programs, put I do request that you give me attribution.

I hope you find something fun to add to your summer storytelling programs and perhaps the coming school year.

CRAFTS

Danielle’s Place
- The following crafts and templates are found on http://tinyurl.com/kmcnyo .
  • The Cow Jumped Over the Moon
  • Sun Moon and Stars Mobile
  • Alien Space Craft
Decorate A Star - Provide each child with a large tag board star-shaped cutout (or have them cut it out themselves). Provide whatever materials you'd like and allow the children to decorate their stars. Some ideas would be markers, paint, glitter, stickers. If you'd like attach a wide Popsicle stick with tape to the star to use as a wand. 
http://stepbystepcc.com/shapes/star.html

Easy Sun Catcher It requires a lid from a margarine container (or I imagine that a yogurt lid might work too), a large amount of Elmer's glue, a piece of string or ribbon, and items to decorate the sun catcher.
  • First fill the container with Elmer's glue and decorate with shells, etc.
  • Let the glue dry completely. The glue dries clear and can be popped out of the lid.
  • With a sharp point make a hole in the sun catcher and put a string through it. Hang it in front of a window and admire!http://tinyurl.com/ncsvpf

Enchanted Learning Lots of astronomy themed crafts here for hours of fun.
http://www.enchantedlearning.com/crafts/astronomy/ 
 
Star Mobile

What You Need:
  • Yellow construction paper
  • String or yarn
  • Two plastic straws
  • Hole puncher
  • Scissors
  • Pencil
  • Eraser
  • Stapler


1. Draw 6-8 stars on the yellow construction paper. Each one should be a different shape or size.
2. When you’re finished, ask a parent to help you cut out the shapes. Cut around the outside of the lines and then use an eraser to remove the pencil marks.
3. Parent Alert: Using the hole puncher, pierce a hole at the top of each star.
4. Cut a piece of string for each of the stars and tie it around the hole. Tip: Vary the length of the string to help your mobile come to life.
5. Parent Alert: Pick up two straws and make the shape of the letter “X” with them. Staple the straws together where the two meet.
6. Cut and tie a long piece of string to where the staple is and then tie the rest of the strings to one of the four limbs of the X.
7. Hang your mobile by the long string in the middle and in your room from the ceiling or in a favorite corner somewhere around the house. Now, you can look at the stars anytime you want!

http://sloanlongway.org/docs/pdf/february13sg.pdf?sfvrsn=2


Starry, Starry Night

Materials

  • Black construction paper
  • Gold or silver and colored self-adhesive stars
  • White chalk

Directions: In advance, cut sheets of self-sticking stars into smaller segments so that each child may have his or her own sheet. Provide each child with a full or half sheet of black construction paper and a piece of chalk. Show the children how to draw on the paper with the chalk, creating such things as stick figures, houses, a moon, or trees. Then hand out the stars and let each child add them to their pictures.
http://tinyurl.com/mj3wce

Sun, Moon, Stars & Planets Theme
-
Rhymes, recipes, activities, songs, finger plays and crafts from Child’s Play.
GAMES AND ACTIVITIES


Star Dance - In advance, cut out 6-inch star shapes from yellow construction paper and tape them to the floor with double-sided tape. Choose music, such as Lullaby Classics by Baby Einstein, to accompany this activity. During the program, turn the music on and have the children dance among the stars by stepping on them, stepping over them, hopping on them, hopping over them, sitting on them, and running over them.

Bubbles - Either make or purchase a bubble mix in advance. To make bubble mix, mix ¼ cup blue dish washing liquid, 1-cup water, 1-teaspoon salt and 1-teaspoon glycerin. Combine well but gently. Do not stir too much and do not shake. Store in a sealed container. Gather bubble wands, or make some from pipe cleaners or from yarn tied to 2 straws. Tell the children to blow the bubbles up to the stars.

http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/ld/projects/trc/2006/manual/todstars.html

One Little Astronaut

One little astronaut floating out from base, Hooked to a hose, exploring space. (Pretend to float in space.)

She thought it was such an amazing trick; she called another astronaut to join her quick. (Beckon with hand.)

Two little astronauts floating out from base (hold hands with second astronaut) Hooked to a hose, exploring space. (Pretend to float in space.)

They thought it was such an amazing trick; they called another astronaut to join them quick. (Beckon with hand.)

Continue until all children are holding hands. http://www.rpls.ws/lgiat/2007/READ/lincollibideas.pdf  (This website is now defunct.)

SONGS AND RHYMES                                       

Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star

Twinkle, twinkle little star,
How I wonder what you are.
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.
Twinkle, twinkle little star,
How I wonder what you are.

Hey Diddle Diddle

Hey diddle, diddle, the cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon.
The little dog laughed to see such sport,
And the dish ran away with the spoon.

Star Light, Star Bright

Star light, star bright,
First star I see tonight.
I wish I may, I wish I might,
Have the wish I wish tonight.

Goodness Gracious Great Balls of Fire (Jerry Lee Lewis version re-written)

You give us light and you make things grow.
At dawn and sunset, well, you hang real low.
You are a star.
Closest by far.
Goodness Gracious Great Balls of Fire!

You may have sunspots and solar flares.
We know at you to never stare.
We all use sunscreen.
Sunburn makes us scream.
Goodness Gracious Great Balls of Fire!

Sun, kiss me, baby! (They cross their arms and shake themselves as they bend at the knees. It makes their voices quiver.)
Feels good!
Sun, warm me, baby!
You warm me like the sun should.
You're bright!
At night!
Come on and shine you light, light, light, light!
Goodness Gracious Great Balls of Fire!

You give us light and you make things grow.
At dawn and sunset, well, you hang real low.
You are a star.
Closest by far.
Goodness Gracious Great Balls of Fire! 
http://teachers.net/lessons/posts/346.html


Lyrics to popular Moon Songs
While some may not be exactly for the younger set, many would be wonderful to play for the older children. 

FINGERPLAYS

Reaching for the Stars

I am reaching for the stars; I am climbing up to Mars
I think I might never stop
I hope I don’t drop …. Kerplop!
I am reaching for the stars; I am climbing up to Mars
I think I might never stop
I hope I don’t drop …. Kerplop!

Mr. Moon

Mr. Moon, Mr. Moon,
You’re out too soon; the sun is still in the sky.
Go back into your bed,
And cover up your head,

PRINTABLES AND COLORING PAGES


A LITTLE SOMETHING EXTRA


Lincoln Library Numerous games, activities, songs and more that will help you blast off to fun! Note: The original link is no longer available but the resources may still be accessed via the Wayback Machine at this link.

Reach for the Stars – A story stretch I wrote back in 2009 for the Summer Reading Program Theme, Spaceship Adventure. This is my own creation. You have my permission to use it in your performances or classroom, however I do request attribution. Should you wish to use it in any publication please contact me for written permission.



Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web links may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2019 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Friday, July 12, 2019

August is National Peach Month: Folktales of Delicious Peaches

Peach Blossoms
by Winslow Homer, 1878

August is National Peach Month! It’s been a while since I’ve had time to research and post a blog but I couldn’t let this delicious celebration go by without sharing some delectable tales to whet your appetite.





Fun Facts About Peaches

  • Peaches were mentioned as early as 79 A.D. in literature.
  • Peaches are at their peak from June to the end of August.
  • The World’s Largest Peach Cobbler is made every year in Georgia. The cobbler measures 11 feet by 5 feet.
  • This plant is closely related to almonds, cherries and plums.
  • The peach originated from China, but it can be found all around the world today. 
  • The peach was known as the ‘Persian Apple’ because ancient Romans believed that the peach originated in Persia.
  • The peach symbolizes immortality and unity in Chinese culture.
  • “You’re a real peach: originated from the tradition of giving a peach to the friend you like.



STORIES

Fadhila’s Secret - Kenya
https://tinyurl.com/y4lop5ld

The Peach Boy - Japan

Peach Darling – Japan
https://tinyurl.com/yxbnmmap

The Silent Cavalier – The Story of the Peach Tree - Azores

The Two Jugglers - China

The Monkey Spirit - China
https://tinyurl.com/y4cegovc

The Queen Mother of the West -China

How Three Heroes Came By Their Deaths Because of Two Peaches - China
https://tinyurl.com/y2h74kr4


CRAFT

Activity Village Giant Peach Craft

RECIPES

Country Living


Be a peach and leave me a comment when you have a moment.  Let me know if you found this or my other blog posts useful in your storytelling, classroom, etc. I would love to hear from you! 


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web links may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2019 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Monday, March 18, 2019

Stor e Telling Summer 2018: Storytelling Traditions Around the World

The Moroccan Storyteller
by Alfred Dehodencq, 1877

Summer is just around the corner so it is time to share my Stor e Telling column in Storytelling Magazine from summer of 2018.  The magazine is a membership benefit of the National Storytelling Network.  If you are interested in getting fabulous articles from around the world, featuring renowned storytellers and educators, along with my most recent column, join us at www.storynet.org.  I will not be sharing anything from any 2019 publications until 2020 rolls around.

Many of us are familiar with The Moth and StoryCorp but what about some of the other ancient forms of storytelling? Below are a few of the fascinating and different traditions from around the world to complement this issue's theme.

Chinese Shadow Puppetry – In the world of shadow puppetry there are various styles of performance, Luanxian, a rare branch of performers who work from a written script, Traditional performance, and the classic Shaanxi. This site is full of information, history, aesthetic, performance clips, and more.

Al Zajal: Intangible Cultural Heritage – This ancient art can be traced back to the 12th century.  “Al-Zajal is a form of Lebanese folk poetry sung at social and family celebrations and in daily life… The poets declaim verses, often in the form of challenges, which are then repeated by the singers and audience.”
https://ich.unesco.org/en/RL/al-zajal-recited-or-sung-poetry-01000

Cunto: Sicily’s Storytelling Tradition - Cuntu is the art of spoken word street storytelling. “For locals its true cultural meaning, however, goes much deeper, conjuring up thoughts of fables, fairy tales and fantastic anecdotes of chivalrous adventure.”

Hula: Dance That Tells a Story -In ancient Hawaii hula played an important role in keeping history, genealogy, mythology, and culture alive.  With each movement a story unfolds.
https://www.gohawaii.com/hawaiian-culture/hula and learn more about the History of the Hula here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXtQNVXNu-A

Kamishibai - Kamishibai (kah-mee-shee-bye) is a form of Japanese street storytelling dating back to the 1920’s. “Most Kamishibai stories consist of 12 or 16 large, sturdy, beautifully illustrated cards. On the back is the English translation of the text, with the original Japanese beside it.”
Something Old and Something New: Rakugo and Japanese Culture – Rakugo, literally ‘fallen words’ traces its origins to Buddhist sermons. “The story is made up of three parts: the makura, or prelude; the hondai, or main story; and the ochithe closing/punch line.”http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/news/japanese_standup.htm
You can listen to 
Master Storyteller Motoko sharing a story in Rakugo style here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOwDpmBYJj8
We move now from the ancient to the modern.

TED Talks
 – "In these Ted Talks masters of storytelling share their creative secrets and explore new approaches to their age-old craft.
https://www.ted.com/topics/storytelling

A
ugust 22 is Be An Angel Day so get ready to fly with these new tales.


The Angel – Hans Christian Andersen
http://hca.gilead.org.il/angel.html

Angel Dance - Indonesia

The Best Wish – The Stories of Three Brothers and an Angel – Slavic
https://fairytalez.com/the-best-wish-the-story-of-three-brothers-and-an-angel/

Dream Bread – Here are seven variants of the same story from around the world.
https://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type1626.html

Mary’s Child - Grimm


The Wonderful Hair – The Story of a Poor Man Who Dreamed of an Angel - Slavic
https://fairytalez.com/the-wonderful-hair-the-story-of-a-poor-man-who-dreamed-of-an-angel/




Below are links to all of the Stor e Telling columns from 2007- to spring of 2018, each with a short synopsis to help you efficiently find what you are seeking. 

SOMETHING EXTRA


Stor e Telling Spring 2018: Storytelling World
In this blog post you will find seven public domain books filled with folktales from Holland, South Africa, Scotland, the Magyars and more. There are also additional stories to help celebrate the national holiday, A Drop of Water Is A Grain of Gold, celebrated in Turkmenistan on April 1. For some extra fun there are tales to get your toes tapping for Dance Like a National Chicken Day on May 14.
https://karenchace.blogspot.com/2019/01/stor-e-telling-spring-2018-storytelling.html

1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources V: Stor e Telling 2017
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/09/1001-nights-to-2001-story-resources-iv.html
1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources IV: Stor e Telling 2016
https://karenchace.blogspot.com/2018/12/1001-nights-to-2001-story-resources-v.html


From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources III: Stor e Telling 2015http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/01/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html

From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources II: Stor e Telling 2014
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2016/01/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html

From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources: Stor e Telling 2013
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/06/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html

Stor e Telling Columns: 2007 to 2012 with Synopses
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/stor-e-telling-columns-2007-to-2012.html



Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web lnks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2019 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.