Monday, March 18, 2019

Stor e Telling Summer 2018: Storytelling Traditions Around the World

The Moroccan Storyteller
by Alfred Dehodencq, 1877

Summer is just around the corner so it is time to share my Stor e Telling column in Storytelling Magazine from summer of 2018.  The magazine is a membership benefit of the National Storytelling Network.  If you are interested in getting fabulous articles from around the world, featuring renowned storytellers and educators, along with my most recent column, join us at www.storynet.org.  I will not be sharing anything from any 2019 publications until 2020 rolls around.

Many of us are familiar with The Moth and StoryCorp but what about some of the other ancient forms of storytelling? Below are a few of the fascinating and different traditions from around the world to complement this issue's theme.

Chinese Shadow Puppetry – In the world of shadow puppetry there are various styles of performance, Luanxian, a rare branch of performers who work from a written script, Traditional performance, and the classic Shaanxi. This site is full of information, history, aesthetic, performance clips, and more.

Al Zajal: Intangible Cultural Heritage – This ancient art can be traced back to the 12th century.  “Al-Zajal is a form of Lebanese folk poetry sung at social and family celebrations and in daily life… The poets declaim verses, often in the form of challenges, which are then repeated by the singers and audience.”
https://ich.unesco.org/en/RL/al-zajal-recited-or-sung-poetry-01000

Cunto: Sicily’s Storytelling Tradition - Cuntu is the art of spoken word street storytelling. “For locals its true cultural meaning, however, goes much deeper, conjuring up thoughts of fables, fairy tales and fantastic anecdotes of chivalrous adventure.”

Hula: Dance That Tells a Story -In ancient Hawaii hula played an important role in keeping history, genealogy, mythology, and culture alive.  With each movement a story unfolds.
https://www.gohawaii.com/hawaiian-culture/hula and learn more about the History of the Hula here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXtQNVXNu-A

Kamishibai - Kamishibai (kah-mee-shee-bye) is a form of Japanese street storytelling dating back to the 1920’s. “Most Kamishibai stories consist of 12 or 16 large, sturdy, beautifully illustrated cards. On the back is the English translation of the text, with the original Japanese beside it.”
Something Old and Something New: Rakugo and Japanese Culture – Rakugo, literally ‘fallen words’ traces its origins to Buddhist sermons. “The story is made up of three parts: the makura, or prelude; the hondai, or main story; and the ochithe closing/punch line.”http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/news/japanese_standup.htm
You can listen to 
Master Storyteller Motoko sharing a story in Rakugo style here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOwDpmBYJj8
We move now from the ancient to the modern.

TED Talks
 – "In these Ted Talks masters of storytelling share their creative secrets and explore new approaches to their age-old craft.
https://www.ted.com/topics/storytelling

A
ugust 22 is Be An Angel Day so get ready to fly with these new tales.


The Angel – Hans Christian Andersen
http://hca.gilead.org.il/angel.html

Angel Dance - Indonesia

The Best Wish – The Stories of Three Brothers and an Angel – Slavic
https://fairytalez.com/the-best-wish-the-story-of-three-brothers-and-an-angel/

Dream Bread – Here are seven variants of the same story from around the world.
https://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type1626.html

Mary’s Child - Grimm


The Wonderful Hair – The Story of a Poor Man Who Dreamed of an Angel - Slavic
https://fairytalez.com/the-wonderful-hair-the-story-of-a-poor-man-who-dreamed-of-an-angel/




Below are links to all of the Stor e Telling columns from 2007- to spring of 2018, each with a short synopsis to help you efficiently find what you are seeking. 

SOMETHING EXTRA


Stor e Telling Spring 2018: Storytelling World
In this blog post you will find seven public domain books filled with folktales from Holland, South Africa, Scotland, the Magyars and more. There are also additional stories to help celebrate the national holiday, A Drop of Water Is A Grain of Gold, celebrated in Turkmenistan on April 1. For some extra fun there are tales to get your toes tapping for Dance Like a National Chicken Day on May 14.
https://karenchace.blogspot.com/2019/01/stor-e-telling-spring-2018-storytelling.html

1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources V: Stor e Telling 2017
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/09/1001-nights-to-2001-story-resources-iv.html
1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources IV: Stor e Telling 2016
https://karenchace.blogspot.com/2018/12/1001-nights-to-2001-story-resources-v.html


From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources III: Stor e Telling 2015http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/01/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html

From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources II: Stor e Telling 2014
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2016/01/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html

From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources: Stor e Telling 2013
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/06/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html

Stor e Telling Columns: 2007 to 2012 with Synopses
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/stor-e-telling-columns-2007-to-2012.html



Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web lnks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2019 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.


Monday, March 4, 2019

The Art of Asking in the Age of the Internet


I always like to say, “If you don’t ask, the answer is already no.” However, our current Internet climate makes it easier than ever for people to click the keys with a quick ‘ask’ without observing any of the polite rules of communication.

I work as a professional storyteller but I also love to research stories and share them on my blog. I am happy to help when a colleague asks for assistance and I receive requests on a regular basis. However, there is an art to asking for help and below I share two distinctly different approaches.

A few months ago I received an instant message from a colleague, which offered no salutation, they didn't even address me by my name. This is not someone I communicate with on a consistent basis, nor have I seen them for over a decade, so the abrupt ‘ask’ felt more like a demand. It took me less than a minute to Google the requested information, with a number of sites appearing on the first Google page. This immediately told me they didn’t conduct any research at all before asking me to do their work. I considered carefully if I would even respond but in the end I did.

Juxtapose that with another message I received last week from a colleague I have never met but know through our Facebook connection.  Storyteller Janet Glantz sent me the following email, which I share here with her permission.

“Hi Karen,

First of all kudos for everything that you do to promote storytelling in all its forms.  I have volunteered to do some Preschool story times for our local library.  My first one is close to St. Patrick's Day.  I looked on your site, but couldn't find the activities, songs, rhymes etc. for St. Patrick's Day.  Do you have any suggestions? I will be going to Sharing the Fire and am looking forward to meeting you face-to-face. 

Kindest Regards,
Janet Glantz

What did I love about this virtual interaction?
  • She begins with an immediate ‘thanks’ before her request.
  • She tried to find the information herself before contacting me.
  • She ends with mentioning an opportunity when we can personally meet outside of the virtual world.

I bet you can guess how eager I was to help her. I knew exactly where the information was on my blog and sent it to her immediately. I look forward to meeting her at the end of this month.

The myriad of instant communication tools we have at our fingertips can be a blessing but because facial expression, vocal intonation, and body language are missing your request for help can easily be misunderstood as a demand. The next time you reach out to a colleague make sure you take a moment to interact with them as if you were face-to-face, not separated by a computer screen. Trust me, those few extra words will be noticed and appreciated across the virtual divide and you are likely to receive the reply, “I’m happy to help” in return.


Karen Chace 2019 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.


Monday, February 4, 2019

Chinese New Year 2019: Year of the Pig

Girl with Pigs
by
Thomas Gainsborough
1781-1782

This year the Chinese New Year begins on February 5, 2019, the Year of the Pig. Read the legend behind the animals of the Chinese Zodiac here: https://wehavekids.com/education/Chinese-Zodiac-Story  

"The Pig is the twelfth of all zodiac animals. According to one myth, the Jade Emperor said the order would be decided by the order in which they arrived to his party. Pig was late because he overslept. Another story says that a wolf destroyed his house. He had to rebuild his home before he could set off. When he arrived, he was the last one and could only take twelfth place.

The Pig is also associated with the Earthly Branch and the hours 9–11 in the night. In terms of yin and yang, the Pig is yin. In Chinese culture, pigs are the symbol of wealth. Their chubby faces and big ears are signs of fortune as well." To read more about those born in the Year of Pig go to https://chinesenewyear.net/zodiac/pig/.

STORIES


The Old Woman and Her Pig - England
http://tinyurl.com/8yagce3

The Pig That Went to Church - United States

The Three Green Men of Glen Nevis - Scotland

The Sheep and the Pig Who Set Up House - Norway
http://tinyurl.com/j5xjj2r

The Story of the Three Little Pigs - England
http://tinyurl.com/b979cte

The Enchanted Pig – Andrew Lang
http://tinyurl.com/z9owtnk 

BOOKS

Children’s Books About Pigs: Funny Bedtime Stories

CRAFTS

Dltk- kids Lots of fun pig crafts here that will have you squealing in no time at all.

CURRICULUM

Asia Education Foundation – Learning activities, teacher’s note and additional references on the Chinese New Year.
                                                           
SOMETHING EXTRA

Traditions: Chinese New Year Clothes
https://chinesenewyear.net/clothes/


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2019 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.


Friday, January 25, 2019

Storytelling Worksheet: Assembling Your Story Recipe

Mother and Child in Kitchen, 1907

Last week I was working with a new storytelling student. I knew he was familiar with his story but wasn’t confident enough to perform it in front of his peers, yet I recognized I was time he took that first step. I approached him privately and asked, "Would you help me with a demonstration by standing in front of the class and summarizing your story? I will prompt you each step of the way by asking specific questions to lead you through it." I was delighted when he agreed.

He successfully completed the demonstration to a hearty round of applause from his peers. I enthusiastically said, “You just performed your story! All you need to do now is add some layers; gestures, facial expressions, etc.”  He gave all of us a huge smile; I look forward to the next time he shares his story to see what ingredients he has added to the tale.

Later that day I was sharing the experience with a colleague and the word ‘layer’ gave me the idea of designing the worksheet below.  I already use a variety of original worksheets, found in my book, 
Story by Story: Creating a Student Storytelling Troupe


focusing on the story setting, the five senses, character development, gestures, storyboards, etc. This worksheet reinforces a few of those elements while adding those associated with stage presence*, how they made the story their own, along with asking them to expand on why they love their story. *While students physically practice stage presence some students with different learning styles will benefit from writing it down.




This exercise took approximately ten minutes for them to complete. I immediately segued into my interactive game, Red Rover Red Rover Send Story Right Over, to reinforce the details shared on their worksheets. It was a very productive and fun storytelling session. I hope you find the worksheet useful.

If you are interested in using it with your own students you have my permission, however, I respectfully ask that you do not remove the copyright information and credit the source. If you would like the worksheet in a .doc file I will be happy to email it to you. You may reach me at storybug@aol.com . If you do use it I would be interested to know how it worked for you and your students.

Please feel free to leave a comment and let me know what you think about this new worksheet. I monitor all comments to avoid spam so you will not immediately see your comment posted until I approve it. Thank you for visiting!



Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web links may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2019 ©
Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.








Monday, January 7, 2019

Stor e Telling Spring 2018: Storytelling World

The Water of Life
by the Brothers Grimm
Illustrator Arthur Rackham, 1916

The New Year is here and that means it’s time to begin sharing my 2018 columns from the National Storytelling Magazine. This information below appeared in the Spring 2018 issue; the theme was ‘Storytelling World.’

I do not post these resources until the year, in which they appeared, has past. Should you wish to receive the new 2019 resources in a timely manner it’s as simple as becoming a member of the National Storytelling Network. The publication offers outstanding articles from well-known storytellers and educators from around the world on a wide variety of topics, and of course, stories. If you would like to become a member please visit https://storynet.org/membership/ .

At the end of the blog you will also find links to all of my columns from 2007 – 2017. At the time they were posted all of the links were active. If you find a dead link please let me know and I will do my best to find the updated source.

I hope you find something useful to add to your storytelling repertoire or classroom activities. As always, I welcome your comments at the end of the blog.

Stor e Telling: Spring 2018

Below are seven resources filled with public domain folktales from around the globe to complement this issue’s Storytelling World theme.

Clever Stories from Many Nations by John Saxe, 1865. Interesting adaptation of stories, all told in rhyme.
https://tinyurl.com/yarlv5er

Dutch Fairy Tales for Young Children - Ten Dutch tales from 1918. Find out why The Stork Loves Holland, visit with the The Princess With Twenty Petty Coats and more.

Folk Tales of Breffny by Bampton Hunt, 1912; The Voice at the Door, The Basket of Eggs, and many more tales await to enchant and delight.
https://tinyurl.com/ychnltq7

The Folktales of the Magyars translated by Jones and Kroph, 1886. The Speaking Grapes, The Smiling Apple and the Tinkling Apricot are just some of many interesting tales from the people of Hungary.

Georgian Folktales -A short collection of folktales from the nation of Georgia by Marjory Wardrop, offered by Sacred Texts. Lose yourself in these stories collected in 1894: The Two Brothers, The Shepherd’s Judge, The King and the Sage and more.
http://tinyurl.com/2rzm5h

South-African Folk-Tales by James A. Honey, M.D. 1910. “This is a collection of South African folklore collected during the 19th century. It includes many great animal tales with classic African wisdom.”

Wonder Tales from Scottish Myth and Legend by Donald Alexander Mackenzie, 1917. Fairies, friends and foes fill this volume of stories from mythical Scotland.

In Turkmenistan April 1 is a national holiday known as A Drop of Water Is a Grain of Gold. Water is very precious in their dry, desert climate; it really is worth its weight in gold.  I offer you some stories about this priceless resource.

The Dance for Water – South Africa
The Drop of Water -Danish
https://tinyurl.com/yauhwrxj

The Hare and the Water – Tanzania

How Water Lilies Came to Be – Wales
This site leads to an educational packet with lessons plan connected to this story. You will find the story within the lesson plan.

The Water Ghost - China

When the Waters Were Changes - Sufi (Lots of stories at this link. You will need to scroll down to find this story.)
http://www.katinkahesselink.net/sufi/stories.html

Why the Sea is Salty – Philippines 

Why the Fish has Scales
https://tinyurl.com/6zycomu

Why the Sun and Moon Live Up in the Sky – Africa

May 14 is Dance Like a Chicken Day. Below are some stories to get you up on your feet !

The Chicken at the Well - Africa
https://tinyurl.com/y7smmt2p

The Hawk and the Hen – Philippines
https://tinyurl.com/y92b9jyk

Lion, Chameleon and Chicken - Tanzania
https://tinyurl.com/ya6hht2m

The Story of Chicken and Elephant – Sudan
https://tinyurl.com/y99ffwym
                                                                     
Why a Hawk Kills Chickens – Nigeria
https://tinyurl.com/yc4wtzlj

Below are links to all of the Stor e Telling columns from 2007-2017, each with a short synopsis to help you efficiently find what you are seeking. 

SOMETHING EXTRA

1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources V: Stor e Telling 2017


1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources IV: Stor e Telling 2016

http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/09/1001-nights-to-2001-story-resources-iv.html

 

From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources III: Stor e Telling 2015
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/01/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html


From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources II: Stor e Telling 2014
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2016/01/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html

From 1001 Nights to 2001 Story Resources: Stor e Telling 2013
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/06/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html

Stor e Telling Columns: 2007 to 2012 with Synopses


Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and web links may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2019 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.



Friday, December 21, 2018

Making History Come Alive


Laskarina Bouboulina
1771-1825
National History of Greece, Athens
Many storytellers portray historical figures as part of their repertoire. If you’ve been thinking about stepping into the pages of history the sites below offer many useful resources.

I hope you find something creative and fun to add to your storytelling work or classroom.









The Historian’s Toolkit This toolkit is based on the Australian curriculum but it will be invaluable to anyone researching historical figures or events. It offers information on continuity, cause and effect, evidence, empathy, significance, notes on using or oral history, a sample timeline and more

Library of Congress – Teaching with Historical Sources - Are you interested in researching an historical figure? This toolkit will help you “examine sources with a purpose.”

Library of Congress: Primary Source Sets A multitude of primary source sets from Abraham Lincoln to WWII. There are also links to additional classroom resources, lesson plans, presentations and activities. This site offers extremely valuable information for teachers and anyone working with historical figures and events.

Researching, Writing and Publishing Local History This is a very quick guide from the city of Ipswich in Australia. It has wonderful tips and ideas to get you started on your historical journey.

Writing Workshop – Historical Narrative - "History is more than typing up notes, more than putting relevant historical information together: history is identifying significant moments and using them to tell a compelling narrative." 

CURRICULUM

Making History Come AliveAn amazing project where students in grades 9-12 interviewed Holocaust survivors and put their stories on the Internet.

Use Storytelling to Make History come Alive in the Classroom -“History is a fascinating subject, so it should be easy to teach and fun to learn… a teacher with a bit of imagination can make history the favorite period of the school day.”

SOMETHING EXTRA

8 Historical Figures with Unusual Work Habits

15 Interesting People That History Somehow Forgot

Library of Congress: Digital Collection – A wide range of interviews on a variety of subjects. This would be very helpful to someone studying a particular subject or historical timeline.

Historical Personalities – “List of famous historical figures & personalities with their biographies that include trivia, interesting facts, timeline and life history.”

Information on the above painting: Laskarina Bouboulina was a "Greek naval officer, eventually awarded the rank of general, Bouboulina was born in May 1771. She was instrumental in Greece’s triumph over the Ottoman Empire in the War of Independence. She built four ships, and used her wealth to provide arms and ammunition to the Greeks."

Please note, websites change at a rapid pace and weblinks may change or break without notice. I cannot be responsible for redirected or broken links.  At the time of this posting all links were in working order. Thank you for understanding.

Karen Chace 2018 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.


Monday, December 17, 2018

27 Lapsit Program Themes: From Apples to Zoos

For a number of years I presented a lapsit program, Whales, Tales, and Sails at the New Bedford Whaling National Historic Park. Each week I planned a different theme based on the calendar and upcoming holidays. I used flannel boards, songs, finger plays, books, stories and the children always made a craft to complement the theme.

For a while I have been sharing each theme separately on my blog but I thought it would be helpful to have them all in one place. The majority of the information connected to each theme was found on various sites on the Internet and do not belong to me. However, there are some original activities I created, which are indicated in the individual blogs.

I hope you will find something useful to use in your teaching or storytelling repertoire. As always, I would love to hear from you in the comment section of the blog at the end of this post.

A Roaring Good Time at the Zoo
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2018/12/preschool-fun-roaring-good-time-at-zoo.html

Bears and Hibernation: Fun for the Little Ones
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2015/11/bears-and-hibernation-fun-for-little.html

Birds, Bees and Butterflies!
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2012/04/birds-bees-and-butterflies.html

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with the Wee Ones: Songs, Rhymes and Fingerplays
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/03/celebrate-st-patricks-day-with-wee-ones.html

Celebrate the New Year in Style with the Small Ones
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/celebrate-new-year-in-style-with-small.html

Celebrating Snow with the Small Ones
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/11/celebrating-snow-with-small-ones.html

Dancing with the Dinosaurs
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/10/dancing-with-dinosaurs.html

Elephants: Gentle Giants Among Us II
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2016/02/elephants-gentle-giants-among-us-ii.html

Elves, Bells and Reindeer
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/elves-bells-and-reindeers.html

Family Fun
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2016/02/family-fun-fingerplays-songs-crafts-and.html

Five Speckled Frogs and So Much More!
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2012/04/five-speckled-frogs-and-so-much-more.html

The Gingerbread Man: Stories, Songs and Fingerplays
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2012/11/the-gingerbread-man-stories-songs-and.html

Gorgeous, Glorious Giraffes
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/03/gorgeous-glorious-giraffes.html

Here’s to Fairy Tales and Happily Ever After
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2015/01/heres-to-fairytales-and-happily-ever.html

It’s Harvest Time: Apple and Pumpkin Fun for the Wee Ones
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/10/its-harvest-time-apple-and-pumpkin-fun.html

Let's Swim With the Fishes!
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2012/05/lets-swim-with-fishes.html

Owls: Flying High with Fingerplays, Songs and More
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2012/12/owls-flying-high-with-fingerplays-songs.html

Penguin Awareness Day
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/01/penguin-awareness-day.html

Race Your Mouse Day: Fun for the Wee Ones
https://karenchace.blogspot.com/2017/08/race-your-mouse-day-fun-for-wee-ones.html

Scarecrows and Halloween: Fingerplays and Songshttp://karenchace.blogspot.com/2012/10/scarecrows-and-halloween-fingerplays.html

Seeking His Shadow: It’s Groundhog Day!
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/01/seeking-his-shadow-its-groundhog-day.html

Spring Is Here: Make Way for Ducklings
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2012/04/spring-is-here-make-way-for-ducklings.html

Swimming Towards the End of Summer: Oceans and Whales
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2012/08/swimming-towards-end-of-summer-oceans.html

Thanksgiving Fun: Fingerplays, Songs, Stories and More!
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2012/11/thanksgiving-fun-fingerplays-songs.html

All Aboard for Preschool Fun: Trains!
https://karenchace.blogspot.com/2018/12/all-aboard-for-preschool-fun-trains.html

Valentine Fun for the Children In Your Life
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/01/valentines-day-fun-for-children-in-your.html

Whales, Tales and Sails!
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2012/09/whales-tales-and-sails.html

SOMETHING EXTRA

Early Child Development Kit: A Treasure Box of Activities
https://www.unicef.org/earlychildhood/files/Activity_Guide.pdf

IFLS Library System: Sample Lapsit: No Theme
https://iflsweb.org/iflsweb.org/storytime/lapsitsample 

Perry Library: Games, Rhymes and Song
http://www.isd21.mb.ca/Preschool/pdfs/Rhymes.pdf

Preschool Activities and Movement Songs
https://www.songsforteaching.com/preschoolkindergartenearlychildhood/activity-movement-songs/

State Library of Iowa: Tips to Help Plan Your Lapsit Serieshttps://www.statelibraryofiowa.org/ld/t-z/youthservices/forlibrarians/lapsit/tips

When their attention begins to wane bring them back with these fun, short activities.

Tootsie Roll

Tootsie Roll (roll hands around each other)
Lollipop (pretend you are licking lollipop)
We've been talking now (hands open shut as if talking)
Now let's stop (hand cutting other palm as if stopping)

Hocus Pocus
Hocus Pocus (wave wand)
Everybody focus (hands up to eyes like glasses)

Counting Down

Five four three two one, zero (count with fingers)
I'm looking for my student hero (binoculars

Hello Bubble (To the tune of Where is Thumbkin)

Hello Bubble, (echo)
Come and land (echo)
Right in the middle (echo )
Of my hand (echo)
Sing it through several times until every child has had bubbles blown towards them.

Shake My Sillies Out – Raffi

I've gotta shake, shake, shake my sillies out,
Shake, shake, shake my sillies out,
Shake, shake, shake my sillies out,
And wiggle my waggles away!

I've gotta clap, clap, clap my crazies out,
Clap, clap, clap my crazies out,
Clap, clap, clap my crazies out,
And wiggle my waggles away!

I've gotta jump, jump, jump my jiggles out,
Jump, jump, jump my jiggles out,
Jump, jump, jump my jiggles out,
And wiggle my waggles away!

I've gotta yawn, yawn, yawn my sleepies out,
Yawn, yawn, yawn my sleepies out,
Yawn, yawn, yawn my sleepies out,
And wiggle my waggles away!
Raffi Shake My Sillies Out lyrics found on http://www.lyricsoncall.com/lyrics/raffi/shake-my-sillies-out-lyrics.html 


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Karen Chace 2018 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.